Psychology is the scientific study of all aspects of behavior and mental processes. The concepts and methods of science are used in the description, explanation, prediction, and modification of behavior. Psychology is a broad discipline with ties to both the social and natural sciences. It provides a base for a variety of academic and professional fields, including psychological research, counseling, clinical psychology, social work, business and industry, medicine, human resources, and law. In addition, an interdisciplinary concentration in neuroscience is coordinated through the Department of Psychological Science.

The Department of Psychological Science prepares students with knowledge in the core areas of psychology, critical thinking skills, and the ability to apply the scientific method as preparation for graduate study, work, or service.

Recommendation for Academic Study:

Completion of MT 122 and MT 223 by the end of sophomore year.

PS 301/301L to be completed by the end of the fall semester of junior year.

PS 401 to be completed by the end of junior year.

PS 499 to be completed by the end of fall and/or spring semester of senior year.

 

Major and Minor Requirements
Major in Psychology: 37 credit hours. PS 101, 301/301L; Group A: PS 318/318L or326; Group B: one course chosen from PS 241, 261, 262; Group C: one course chosen from PS 351, 435, 455, 457; Group D: one course chosen from PS 332/332L, 380/380L, 386. The remaining 18 hours are PS electives at the 200 level or above.PS 101 is the only 100-level course that may be counted in the major.Students must have completed PS 101 and hold a minimum overall 2.5 GPA in order to declare Psychology as a major.At least seven courses must be at the 300-400 level.No more than 6 hours of credit for courses at or above PS 480 can be counted toward the major.At least 18 hours in the major must be taken at John Carroll University.A comprehensive examination, given during the senior year, must be passed by all majors in psychology.

Required Support Courses: MT 122 and MT 223 (minimum grade of C- required in MT 223) should be taken by the end of the sophomore year. MT 228 may substitute for MT 122.

Minor in Psychology: 22 credit hours. PS 101, 301/301L, plus one course from each content group (A, B, C, and D), and one elective at the 200 level or higher.

Learning Goals

  1. Knowledge base in the core areas of psychology.
  2. Critical thinking skills.
  3. Communication skills in the language of psychology.
  4. Information and technological literacy.
  5. Research methods and statistics in psychology.
  6. Ethics and values of the discipline.
  7. Sociocultural and international awareness.
  8. Application of psychology, including service to the community.

The Psychology Major

Psychology majors receive a firm grounding in the scientific aspects of the discipline. After completing the introductory psychology course (PS 101), majors choose from a number of courses to gain a foundation in the core areas of the discipline. Once this foundation is achieved, students move on to upper-division specialty courses that add depth to their knowledge of psychology.

Psychology majors and minors are also required to complete course work in statistics and psychological research. This training is essential for students to receive adequate preparation for either graduate study or a professional career in psychology or an allied discipline.

PS 101 is prerequisite to all courses at the 200 level and beyond in psychology, unless otherwise noted. PS 101 is the only 100-level course that is counted in the psychology major. Majors may apply other 100-level psychology courses to the University Core or general elective credit-hour requirements. Check the listings in the schedule of classes each semester to see which courses may be applied to Division IV and other University Core requirements.

Preparation for Graduate Study in Psychology: Graduate study in psychology takes many forms. Students seek admission in many specialty areas, including clinical, developmental, social, industrial/organizational, sports, comparative, biological, experimental, cognitive, school, or counseling psychology, and neuroscience. The psychology major is also excellent preparation for medical school and other health professions, law school, business administration, and social work. Students planning to pursue a graduate degree in psychology or an allied discipline should seek a firm foundation in the core areas of psychology and obtain research experience through additional course work and independent study. The following courses are recommended for students planning graduate study: PS 190, 241, 261, 262, 301/301L, 318/318L, 326, 332/332L, 365, 380/380L, 401, 421, 435, 457, 471, and 497N or 499.

Specialized Tracks in Psychology: Psychology majors may elect to complete one of the following four tracks in applied psychology. These focused tracks were designed for students with specialized interests in applying psychological principles in business, school, or mental health settings. Because courses in these tracks are not offered every semester, careful planning and course selection will increase the likelihood of successfully completing a track.

Child and Family Studies: This track provides an opportunity for students to examine development from prenatal development through the end of life by the integration of theory and practice. There is a focus on the individual and individuals in a family context. This course of study supports students who wish to work in applied settings with children and families after graduation, as well as those who wish to continue to graduate study. Completing both the child and family studies track and the psychology major requires all of the following courses: PS 101, 261, 262, 301/301L, 326, 332/332L, 342, 365, 435, 455 or 457, SC 225 or 275, two PS electives, and an approved senior seminar. Coordinator: Sheri Young, Ph.D.

Forensic Psychology Track: This track is intended for students who have an interest in clinical psychology, forensic psychology, criminology, or law, as well as those who will be seeking employment in the criminal justice system. Requirements for completing both the forensic psychology track and the psychology major are as follows: PS 101, 301/301L, 370, 435, 457, 471; one of PS 318/318L or 326; one of PS 241, 261, or 262; one of PS 332/332L, 380/380L, or 386; one of PS 470, 482, or 483; and one of PS 375 or 462; one of SC 220, 240, or 345. Coordinator: Elizabeth Swenson, Ph.D.

Industrial/Organizational Psychology: This track is intended for two groups of students: those who wish to pursue graduate training in I/O psychology and those seeking employment in I/O-related areas. Students prepare for entry-level positions in a variety of work settings that involve job analysis, staffing, training, and performance evaluation. Students should select their courses carefully and consult with the Department of Psychology early in their program. Course prerequisites must be observed. Completing both the I/O track and the psychology major requires all of the following: PS 101, 241, 301/301L, 359, 435, 459, 480C, 481C, two additional PS electives; one of PS 318/318L or 326; one of PS 332/332L, 380/380L, 386; four of MN 353, 370, 373, 376, CO 300, 305, BI 200. Coordinator: Beth Martin, Ph.D.

Mental Health Services: This track is intended for two groups of students: those who plan on graduate study in clinical/counseling psychology or related fields immediately or shortly after graduation, and those who will be seeking employment in some area of human services immediately after graduation. Those planning to go to graduate school should follow the advice given above in the section on preparation for graduate study. In most cases, these students will do only one semester of practicum. Students planning to seek employment after graduation should consider doing two semesters of practicum, either at one setting or two. Requirements for completing both the mental health services track and the psychology major are as follows: PS 101, 301/301L, 435, 457, 462, 471, 477, 482C, or 483C; one course chosen from PS 241, 261, 262; one of PS 332/332L or 380/380L; one of PS 318/318L or 326; and at least one additional PS elective. Coordinator: David W. Rainey, Ph.D.

Interdisciplinary Concentration in Neuroscience

This interdisciplinary concentration is coordinated by the Department of Psychology. The program provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study of physiology, biochemistry, and the behavior of higher animals. The program and the required courses are described in the section of this Bulletin on “Interdisciplinary Minors and Concentrations,” pages 82-89. Coordinator: Helen M. Murphy, Ph.D.

Interdisciplinary Concentrations

Besides Neuroscience, the Department of Psychology participates in the Aging Studies and Africana Studies interdisciplinary concentrations (see pages 82-89).

Co-Operative 3/2 Program with the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences

A special agreement with the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences (M-SASS) at Case Western Reserve University enables qualified psychology majors to enroll in the M-SASS program after their junior year at John Carroll. Successful completion of this two-year program results in a B.S. in psychology from John Carroll and a master’s in social work from Case Western Reserve University. For details, including standards for eligibility, consult the chair of the Department of Sociology and Criminology who coordinates this program, during freshman year.

101. INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY 3 cr. Fundamental principles of behavior, including research methods, learning, memory and cognition, biological basis of behavior, perception, motivation, human development, social psychology, personality, psychopathology, and psychological testing. A prerequisite to all PS courses at the 200 level and beyond.

150. VIOLENCE AND AGGRESSION 3 cr. Biological, psychological, and sociological aspects of violence and aggression. Basic theories and principles relevant to the topic in general and the components of specific acts and forms of violence. Does not fulfill requirements of the psychology major.

175. LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENT 3 cr. Survey of basic theories and research relative to human growth and development from prenatal development through the end of life with an emphasis on the physiological, cognitive, socio-emotional, psychological, and cultural changes at various stages of life. Intended for non-majors, particularly those pursuing careers in the health professions. Does not fulfill requirements of the psychology major. Cannot be taken concurrently with PS 261, PS 262, or PS 365.

190. PLANNING FOR GRADUATE SCHOOL IN PSYCHOLOGY 1 cr. Information on preparation for selection of and applying to psychology graduate programs. Does not fulfill requirements of the psychology major. Pass/Fail.

226. DRUGS AND BEHAVIOR 3 cr. Prerequisite: PS 101 or BL 155. Introduction to the field of psychopharmacology with special emphasis on the relationship between drugs and human behavior. Topics include history, routes of administration, absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and adverse effects of psychoactive drugs. Students intending to follow the neuroscience concentration must take PS 426, not PS 226.

241. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 cr. Introduction to the scientific field that explores the nature and causes of individual behavior and thought in social situations. Social psychology is the science of everyday, normal behavior. Topics include nonverbal behavior, the detection of lying, attributions we make about the causes of behavior, social cognition, prejudice, self-concept, interpersonal attraction, persuasion, and aggression.

261. CHILD DEVELOPMENT 3 cr. Prerequisite: PS 101 (or ED 201 for Education majors only). Survey of the basic theories and research relative to human growth and development from conception through late childhood, with emphasis on the physiological, intellectual, social, emotional, and cultural changes associated with human life. Cannot be taken concurrently with PS 175.

262. ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT 3 cr. Prerequisite: PS 101 (or ED 201 for education majors only). Survey of the basic theories and research relative to human growth and development from pre-adolescence to young adulthood, with emphasis on the physiological, intellectual, socio-emotional, and cultural changes associated with human life. Cannot be taken concurrently with PS 175.

295. INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY 1-3 cr. A selection of courses on a variety of topics in psychology designed for both psychology and non-psychology majors; appropriate for exploring special topics at the 200 level. Students seeking a more advanced focus on special topics in psychology should register for PS 395 or 495.

299. RESEARCH EXPERIENCE IN PSYCHOLOGY 1-3 cr. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A beginning/intermediate-level research practicum to gain familiarity with the process of research in areas such as (a) learning to conduct a literature review, (b) gaining familiarity with SPSS software, (c) managing and organizing databases, (d) collecting data, and (e) scoring/coding psychological measures. Supervising faculty will guide the research. May be repeated for a cumulative maximum of 3 credit hours.

301. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND ANALYSIS IN PSYCHOLOGY 4 cr. Prerequisites: MT 122, 223 (with at least a C- in MT 223); corequisite: PS 301L. Introduction to the scientific method as it is used to design, conduct, and analyze experiments in psychology.

301L. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND ANALYSIS LABORATORY 0 cr. Corequisite: PS 301. Two hours of laboratory per week. Students work in groups to design and conduct an experiment investigating some aspect of human behavior, then analyze the data.

310. SPORT PSYCHOLOGY 3 cr. Topics include personality and sport; anxiety, arousal, and sport performance; motivation in sport; violence in sport; socialization in sport; psychological benefits of sport and exercise; and psychology of sport injuries.

318. SENSATION AND PERCEPTION 3 cr. Corequisite: PS 318L. Structure and function of the sensory systems, how they encode environmental stimuli, and how we process these stimuli to perceive the world. Perceptual illusions are demonstrated and explained.

318L. SENSATION AND PERCEPTION LABORATORY 0 cr. Corequisite: PS 318. Two hours of laboratory per week. Students will participate in experiments investigating human perception related to topics in PS 318.

326. PSYCHOBIOLOGY 3 cr. Prerequisite: PS 101 or BL 155. Study of the anatomical, physiological, and biochemical mechanisms underlying behavior.

332. LEARNING AND BEHAVIOR 3 cr. Corequisite: PS 332L. Fundamentals of classical and operant conditioning and how they may be used to change behavior in applied settings.

332L. LEARNING AND BEHAVIOR LABORATORY 0 cr. Corequisite: PS 332. Two hours of laboratory per week. Applying principles of operant and classical conditioning; specifying behavioral objectives; applying principles of reinforcement to change behavior.

342. PSYCHOLOGY OF PREJUDICE 3 cr. Discussion of classic and contemporary theories and research on stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination, and intolerance.

351. THEORIES OF PERSONALITY (ED 451) 3 cr. Survey of major personality theories with critical consideration of research support and clinical/counseling applications.

359. INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 cr. Topics for understanding the selection and evaluation of workers within organizations. Current theories of work motivation, job design, and leadership, with an emphasis on applications within organizations.

365. ADULTHOOD AND AGING 3 cr. Study of growth and development from young adulthood to the end of life with emphasis on life stages, transitions, and the breadth of human experience. Cannot be taken concurrently with PS 175.

370. FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY 3 cr. Overview of the implications of psychological theory and methods for various legal issues and the legal perspective on some psychological issues. Social science research on legal topics such as confessions, eyewitness testimony, the jury, insanity, and competency. Focuses on the criminal justice system with some civil issues. No knowledge of the legal system is assumed.

375. CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 cr. Topics unique to the clinical psychologist, including psychological assessment, treatment intervention, professional issues, single-case research designs, and subspecialties in the area of clinical psychology. Specialized topics include neuropsychology, forensic psychology, and child clinical psychology.

380. HUMAN MEMORY AND COGNITION 3 cr. Corequisite: PS 380L. What psychology has found about how people acquire and use knowledge. Topics include attention, how meaning is represented, memory, language, reasoning, and problem solving.

380L. HUMAN MEMORY AND COGNITION LABORATORY 0 cr. Corequisite: PS 380. Two hours of laboratory per week. Students participate in experiments investigating human cognition related to topics in PS 380.

386. MIND, BRAIN, AND BEHAVIOR 3 cr. Prerequisite: PS 101 or BL 155. Examination of the nature of mind in relationship to cellular structure, chemical signals, and operations in the brain. Association of functions of the brain with human consciousness, language, thinking, memory, and emotion. Application of modern imaging and recording techniques to explain differences between high functioning and impaired functioning individuals.

395. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY 1-3 cr. A selection of courses on a variety of special topics in psychology designed for both psychology and non-psychology majors; appropriate for exploring special topics at the 300 level. Students seeking a more advanced treatment of special topics in psychology should register for PS 495.

401. ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY 3 cr. Prerequisites: PS 301 and PS 301L (with at least a B) and permission of instructor. Students plan, conduct, and analyze data from individual research projects, and prepare a manuscript suitable for submission to a psychological journal.

421. HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY 3 cr. Development of psychology from its philosophical antecedents to its present status as a behavioral science and profession. Recommended as preparation for the departmental comprehensive examination.

426. PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY 3 cr. Prerequisite: PS 326 or BL 155. Not open to those with credit in PS 226. Effects of psychotropic drugs on behavior, cognitive functioning, and emotion, with an emphasis on both psychotherapeutic agents utilized in the treatment of biochemical abnormalities associated with various psychopathologies and drugs of abuse.

435. TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS 3 cr. Prerequisite: MT 122 or equivalent. Survey and evaluation of current psychological test theory. Test construction, reliability, validity, and frequently used psychological tests are covered. This is not a course in test administration.

455. CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOPATHOLOGY 3 cr. Prerequisite: PS 261 or 262. Conceptualization and definition of developmental psychopathology; the study of developmental processes that contribute to the formation of, or resistance to, psychopathology. Specific focus on the causes, assessment, and treatment of developmental and behavioral disturbances in infants, children, and adolescents. Above all, this course aims to illuminate the mutual influences of psychopathology and normal developmental processes.

457. PSYCHOPATHOLOGY 3 cr. Theories and controversies about psychopathology and the etiology and symptoms of selected categories of emotional disturbance, with special reference to the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual.

459. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AND GOAL SETTING 3 cr. Prerequisite: PS 359 or MN 325. Integration of applied and theoretical principles of performance evaluation and goal setting into today’s workplace.

462. COUNSELING THEORY AND PRACTICE 3 cr. Major counseling theories, including psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and phenomenological theories as well as third-wave therapies, such as acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). Discussion of the techniques employed in these approaches and empirical support for therapeutic interventions.

470. SEMINAR ON CHILDREN IN THE LEGAL SYSTEM 3 cr. Overview of relevant case and statutory law pertaining to children and families. Topics include parental rights, child protection, child custody, foster care, juvenile justice, children’s rights, children in the courtroom, decision making, and the termination of the parental relationship. A term paper and participation in a mock trial are required.

471. SEMINAR IN ETHICS IN PSYCHOLOGY 3 cr. Professional ethics in the field of psychology. Ethical dilemmas that confront mental health service providers and counselors, researchers, university-level educators, and those in psychology-related fields who work in other settings. Basis for the course is the American Psychological Association Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct and how it is useful in the analysis and resolution of ethical dilemmas.

476. SENIOR SEMINAR IN CHILD AND FAMILY STUDIES 3 cr. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Students following the Child and Family Studies track will discuss issues related to children and families.

477. SENIOR SEMINAR IN MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES 3 cr. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Students following the Mental Health Services track will discuss issues related to the delivery of mental health services.

478. SENIOR SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY 3 cr. Series of courses on a variety of special topics in psychology designed for senior psychology students.

480-489. PRACTICA IN PSYCHOLOGY 1-3 cr. Limited to junior and senior psychology majors with permission of instructor. Supervised application of psychological principles and techniques in appropriate settings. Arrangements for the practicum site need to be completed, in consultation with the instructor, in the semester prior to the placement. A scholarly paper, developed in conjunction with the supervising faculty member, is required. Specific practica are listed below.

480-481. PRACTICUM IN I/O PSYCHOLOGY 1-3 cr. Business and industrial settings.

482-483. PRACTICUM IN MENTAL HEALTH 1-3 cr. Educational and clinical settings.

484-485. PRACTICUM IN GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 1-3 cr. Educational, clinical, governmental, business, and industrial settings.

486-487. PRACTICUM IN CHILD AND FAMILY STUDIES 1-3 cr. Educational, clinical, and school settings.

488-489. PRACTICUM: THE HOSPITALIZED CHILD 3 cr. Prerequisites: PS 261 or PS 262 and permission of instructor. Sequence of supervised experiences in the application of psychological principles and techniques to physical and emotional problems with infants, children, adolescents, and their families in a university medical setting.

494. INTERNSHIP AND SEMINAR IN FORENSIC SCIENCE 3 cr. Prerequisites: senior standing, completion of at least 18 hours of the Forensic Behavioral Science minor (including SC 223, and either PS 370 or SC 388), and permission of instructor. Internship includes field placement in a law enforcement, criminal justice, legal, or research setting in which forensic work is currently conducted. Placement includes a weekly time commitment to the host site and some hands-on responsibilities; also, a weekly seminar requiring ongoing reports, reflection, and analysis by fellow interns about their field experience. Cross-listed with SC 494.

495. ADVANCED SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY 1-3 cr. A selection of courses on a variety of special topics in psychology designed for psychology majors and non-majors.

496. READINGS IN PSYCHOLOGY 1-3 cr. Prerequisites: 3.0 GPA and permission of instructor and department chair. Supervised readings course for advanced undergraduates, mutually arranged by each student and a faculty member so that the student may become informed in depth on a specialized topic in psychology. Requires critical and original review of the literature. A course plan must be developed with the instructor and approved by the department chair prior to enrollment.

497N. ADVANCED RESEARCH TOPICS IN NEUROSCIENCE 3 cr. Prerequisites: 3.0 GPA and permission of neuroscience concentration coordinator. Advanced undergraduate participation in the conception, design, execution, and reporting of a research project in neuroscience. A course plan must be developed with the instructor and approved by the neuroscience coordinator prior to enrollment.

498. PRACTICUM IN RESEARCH METHODS 1-3 cr. Prerequisites: PS 301, and permission of instructor. Practicum in research methods and assisting instructor by serving as resource person for students in PS 301.

499. INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH PROJECT IN PSYCHOLOGY 1-3 cr. Prerequisites: 3.0 GPA, PS 401, and permission of instructor and department chair. Advanced undergraduate participation in the conception, design, execution, and reporting of a research project in psychology. Research should be publishable, and the student’s contribution should warrant citation as co-author. A course plan must be developed with the instructor and approved by the department chair prior to enrollment.