Linda M. Gojak, director of the Center of Mathematics and Science Education, Teaching, and Technology (CMSETT) began her term as president-elect of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) at the conclusion of the Council’s annual meeting in Indianapolis on April 16. She will work alongside current president J. Michael Shaughnessy until assuming the presidency in April 2012 for a two-year term (2012–2014).

Gojak and four new board members fill out the 14-member board that serves as the chief policymaking body for the world’s largest professional organization dedicated to the teaching and learning of mathematics. With 100,000 members, NCTM supports mathematics educators in all 50 states and Canada. In addition, the Council provides information and services to members in 104 countries around the globe. Gojak will attend her first board meeting in July.

When asked about what she hopes to focus on during her term on the NCTM Board of Directors, Gojak said, “The Common Core State Standards offer an opportunity and a challenge for all mathematics teachers. NCTM will help teachers to successfully implement these standards, which focus on student reasoning and sense making. We should also strengthen our network of Affiliates—our members at the local level, who make excellence in mathematics education happen—so that everyone takes on this mission. ”

Since 1999, Gojak has served as director of the CMSETT. She brings to her NCTM leadership nearly 40 years of experience in teaching mathematics at all levels in the United States, as well as considerable work with students, teachers, and professional organizations throughout the country.

In 1990, Gojak received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching. The Ohio Council of Teachers of Mathematics has honored Gojak with the Christofferson-Fawcett Award for Leadership in Mathematics Education, the Buck Martin Award, and the Outstanding District Teacher Award.

She has served as president of the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics, Ohio Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and Greater Cleveland Council of Teachers of Mathematics and has been a member of the Mathematical Sciences Education Board. Her professional memberships also include the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators, Benjamin Banneker Association, California Mathematics Council, Council of Presidential Awardees, Ohio Mathematics Education Leadership Council, and TODOS: Mathematics for ALL.

Gojak’s NCTM leadership includes serving as a member of the Council’s Board of Directors, Arithmetic Teacher Editorial Panel; co-chair of the Cleveland regional conferences; program committee member for the Indianapolis Annual Meeting; and program chair for the Minneapolis Annual Meeting. Most recently, she was a reviewer for Curriculum Focal Points for Prekindergarten through Grade 8 Mathematics: A Quest for Coherence.

Gojak earned her master’s and bachelor’s degrees in education from Kent State University and Miami University, respectively.

The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics is a public voice of mathematics education, supporting teachers to ensure equitable mathematics learning of the highest quality for all students through vision, leadership, professional development, and research. With more than 100,000 members and 230 Affiliates, NCTM is the world’s largest organization dedicated to improving mathematics education in prekindergarten through grade 12. The Council’s Principles and Standards for School Mathematics includes guidelines for excellence in mathematics education and issues a call for all students to engage in more challenging mathematics. Its Curriculum Focal Points for Prekindergarten through Grade 8 Mathematics identifies the most important mathematical topics for each grade level. Focus in High School Mathematics: Reasoning and Sense Making advocates practical changes to the high school mathematics curriculum to refocus learning on reasoning and sense making. NCTM is dedicated to ongoing dialogue and constructive discussion with all stakeholders about what is best for our nation’s students.

 

Posted on May 24, 2011
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