• Religion: The New Testament was written in Greek. Read the foundational text of Christianity in its original words! Latin has been the language of the Catholic Church for thousands of years. Latin phrases like “cura personalis” and “ad maiorem Dei gloriam” continue to be used as key words in Jesuit education.
  • English Language Skills: A knowledge of Latin and Greek roots will markedly enhance your English vocabulary. Study of Latin and Greek language structures will improve your understanding of language itself and your ability to communicate effectively in English.
  • Heroism: ”The Iliad” and the “The Odyssey,” written in Greek, represent the beginning of Western literature. Read them and consider for yourself what it takes to be a hero, then and now.
  • Philosophy: Get into the brain of great philosophers like Plato and Aristotle by reading their own words in Greek. Really understand all those Greek words that your philosophy professors will write on the board.
  • Literature: Latin authors like Vergil and Ovid exerted tremendous influence on later European literature. Examine them in their own cultural context and their impact on literature through the ages.
  • Government: The first great experiment with democracy began in Greece in 510 B.C. Read authors from that period, study historical documents, and think about the advantages and challenges of democracy. Then examine the Roman Republic, the system of government that our American founders saw as a model.

Classics and Your Career

  • John Carroll offers a path to teacher licensure in Latin. With Latin on the upswing in K-12 education, high school Latin teachers are in high demand. Even students without certification have many options to teach at private schools.
  • Knowledge of Greek is valuable for pre-med students and those wishing to specialize in the history of classical art, in philosophy, or religious studies.
  • Latin is also important for students who wish to major in biology, English, history, pre-law, philosophy, pre-medicine, and religious studies.
  • Majors in classical languages have gone on to successful careers in such diverse areas as teaching, law, banking, library science, diplomatic service, and business.
  • A degree in classics, no matter your profession, marks you as a well-educated individual who can work through complex material and take the long view of events. Employers know this and value it.