Colosseum, Rome, Italy (Creative Commons, Francesco Gasparetti)

Beginning Independent Study (198) - 1-3 credit hours
Supervised independent study at the beginning level. May be repeated with a different topic.

Special Topics (199) - 1-3 credit hours
Topics to be selected by instructor and announced in the class schedule. Only a three-credit course may apply to the Core. May be repeated with a different topic.

Word Power Through The Classics (210) – 3 credit hours
Focus on the Greek and Latin roots of the English language. Special emphasis on legal, medical, and scientific terminology.

Classical Mythology (220) – 3 credit hours
An introduction to the myths of Greece and Rome. Special attention to ancient conceptions of the gods, the nature of the hero, functions of myth, and modern retellings of classical myth.

The Classical World in Film (222) – 3 credit hours
The representation of Greek and Roman culture in film. A study of films, both masterworks and travesties, in relation to the classical texts that have inspired them.

History of Ancient Greek Philosophy (230) – 3 credit hours
Ancient Greek philosophical thought, with major emphasis on the works of Plato and Aristotle.

Classical Epic in English (240) – 3 credit hours
The Iliad and Odyssey of Homer, the Aeneid of Vergil, and other classical epic poems. Oral and literary epic, romantic epic, and historical epic; their development and characteristics.

Classical Drama in English (250) – 3 credit hours
Greek and Roman comedy and tragedy, with special attention paid to the tragic and comic hero, staging, and the role of performance within Greek and Roman culture.

Classical Satire in English (260) – 3 credit hours
Readings from such authors as Horace, Juvenal, Persius, and Petronius, who cast a critical eye on Rome and its vices.

Women in Ancient Greece and Rome (290) – 3 credit hours
Representation of women in ancient literature and art. An examination of both fictional and real women (e.g., Medea, Cleopatra) and the everyday details of anonymous women’s lives.

Intermediate Independent Study (298) – 1-3 credit hours
Supervised independent study. May be repeated with a different topic.

Special Topics (299) – 1-3 credit hours
Occasional course on a selected topic announced in advance. May be repeated with a different topic.

Ancient Greek History (301) – 3 credit hours
Greek history from the Minoan period through the zenith of Athenian democracy, to the conquests of Alexander and eventual incorporation into the Roman empire. Special emphasis on Greek cultural achievements.

Roman History (302) – 3 credit hours
History of Rome from its humble beginning, through the Roman Republic, to the creation and collapse of the Roman empire. Attention paid to all aspects of Roman life, from family and social structure to political institutions.

Philosophy of Language (303) – 3 credit hours
Implications of linguistic experience beginning with a survey of the main historical approaches to the meaning of language. Consideration of special problems such as sense and reference; thought and language; sign, symbol and metaphor; linguistics and logic.

The Archaeology of Greece (340) – 3 credit hours
 Study of the major archaeological sites of Greece from the Bronze Age through the classical period. Attention paid to the development of Greek material culture (including architecture, sculpture, and pottery) and its relationship to Greek history. Includes a study tour in Greece.

Special Topics (399) – 1-3 credit hours
Occasional course on a selected topic announced in advance. May be repeated with a different topic.


Greek (GK)

Beginning Greek I (101) – 3 credit hours
An introduction to ancient Greek, the language of Socrates, Homer, and the New Testament, through study of the fundamentals of grammar and vocabulary. An emphasis on the development of reading skills. Usually taken in the fall.

Beginning Greek II (102) – 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Greek 101 or equivalent. Continued study of ancient Greek language and culture through further acquisition of fundamental vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Continued reading and discussion of passages. Usually taken in the spring.

Beginning Independent Study (198) – 1-3 credit hours
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Supervised independent study at the beginning level. May be repeated with a different topic.

Special Topics (199) – 1-3 credit hours
Occasional course on a selected topic announced in advance. May be repeated with a different topic.

Greek Authors (232) – 3 credit hours
Continued development of reading skills through reading from one selected author, such as Homer, Xenophon, Plato, Lysias. Discussion of the author’s thought and historical context. Course may be repeated with a different author.

Readings in the Gospels (280) – 3 credit hours
Readings from one of the Gospels. May be repeated with a different author. Focus on New Testament vocabulary and syntax.

The Letters of Paul (281) – 3 credit hours
Readings from the Pauline epistles. Focus on New Testament vocabulary and syntax.

Greek Writing (301) – 3 credit hours
Practice in writing idiomatic Greek prose.

Plato (320) – 3 credit hours
Selected works. Projects on Plato’s philosophical theories.

Greek Historical Prose (330) – 3 credit hours
Reading from the works of one selected Greek historian, such as Herodotus, Thucydides, or Xenophon. Projects in Greek historiography. May be repeated with a different author.

Homer (340) – 3 credit hours
Reading of selections from the Iliad or Odyssey. Special attention paid to Homeric vocabulary and syntax, the composition of the epics, the Epic Cycle, and Homer’s influence.

Independent Study (398) – 1-3 credit hours
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Supervised independent study. May be repeated with a different topic.

Special Topics (399) – 1-3 credit hours
Occasional course on a selected topic announced in advance. May be repeated with a different topic.

Greek Lyric (442) – 3 credit hours
Poetry from the archaic and classical periods of Greece, including such authors as Archilochus and Sappho. Examination of the themes of love, war, and the symposium. Emphasis on the personal voice and the poet’s persona, the cultural context of the poetry, and the genesis of important literary genres.

Greek Drama (450) – 3 credit hours
Reading from the plays of one of the following: Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Menander. Projects on the origins of drama, historical background, social and political ideas of the times, and staging conventions. May be repeated with a different author.

History of Greek Literature (490) – 3 credit hours
A survey of writings from Homer to the Alexandrian period, with extensive readings in the major authors. Reflection of these works in modern literature.

Advanced Independent Study (498) – 1-3 credit hours
Supervised study on special topics. For advanced students. May be repeated with a different topic.

Special Topics (499) – 1-3 credit hours
Occasional course on a selected topic announced in advance. May be repeated with a different topic.


Latin (LT)

Beginning Latin I (101) – 3 credit hours
An introduction to the language of the Romans through study of the fundamentals of Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Special attention paid to Latin roots of English vocabulary. Usually taken in the fall.

Beginning Latin II (102) – 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: Latin 101 or equivalent. Continued study of Roman culture through further acquisition of Latin grammar and syntax. Increased emphasis on the reading of literary passages. Usually taken in the spring.

Beginning Independent Study (198) – 1-3 credit hours
Supervised independent study of Latin at a beginning level. May be repeated with a different topic.

Special Topics (199) – 1-3 credit hours
Occasional course on selected topics announced in advance. May be repeated with a different topic.

Readings in Myth and History I (201) – 3 credit hours
Prerequisite: a year of college Latin or its equivalent. Review of grammar and syntax through readings taken from classical mythology and Roman history. Usually taken in the fall.

Readings in Myth and History II (202) – 3 credit hours
Continuation of LT 201; more readings from Roman mythology and history; also, St. Perpetua’s autobiography. Usually taken in the spring.

Lating Prose Authors (231) – 3 credit hours
Reading from a selected author, such as Cicero or Caesar. Development of reading skills; analysis of the author’s thought and cultural context.

Introduction to Latin Poetry (232) – 3 credit hours
Reading from a selected author, such as Catullus or Vergil. Introduction to Latin meter and poetic conventions, as well as acquisition of poetic vocabulary.

Intermediate Independent Study (298) – 1-3 credit hours
Supervised independent study of Latin at the intermediate level. May be repeated with a different topic.

Special Topics (299) – 1-3 credit hours
Occasional course on a selected topic announced in advance. May be repeated with a different topic.

Latin Writing (301) – 3 credit hours
Practice in writing idiomatic Latin prose.

Roman Epistolary Writing (320) – 3 credit hours
Reading from the letters of a writer such as Cicero, Horace, Pliny, Ovid, or Seneca. Course may be repeated with a different author.

Roman Historical Writing (330) – 3 credit hours
Roman history through the eyes of a Roman historian, such as Livy, Tacitus, Sallust, or Caesar. Course may be repeated with a different author.

Advanced Roman Poetry (340) – 3 credit hours
Reading from the works of a poet, such as Catullus, Vergil, Horace, Tibullus, Propertius, or Ovid. Origins of lyric, pastoral, elegiac poetry. Course may be repeated with a different author.

Independent Study (398) – 3 credit hours
Supervised independent study of Latin. May be repeated with a different topic.

Special Topics (399) – 1-3 credit hours
Occasional course on a selected topic announced in advance, such as the writings of St. Augustine. May be repeated with a different topic.

Roman Satire (410) – 3 credit hours
Reading from a Roman satirist, such as Horace, Juvenal, or Persius. Study of the characteristics of Roman satire, the satirist’s view of his culture, and the influence of Roman satire on later literature. Course may be repeated with a different author.

Roman Drama (450) – 3 credit hours
Reading from the works of such dramatists as Plautus, Terence, and Seneca. Development of Roman drama, its connection with Roman society, and its influence on later drama. Course may be repeated with a different author.

History of Roman Literature (490, 491) – 3 credit hours each
Lectures, discussions, and translations of authors not read previously. 490: Roman literature from the beginning to the Golden Age. 491: Nature and characteristics of Silver Age literature.

Advanced Independent Study (498) – 1-3 credit hours
Supervised study on special topics. For advanced students. Course may be repeated with a different subject matter.

Special Topics (499) – 1-3 credit hours
Occasional course on a selected topic announced in advance.  May be repeated with a different topic.