Center for Student Diversity & Inclusion

Cultural Health

The American Mindfulness Research Association (AMRA) was founded in 2013. Their mission is to support empirical and conceptual efforts to: (1) establish an evidence base for the process, practice, and construct of mindfulness; (2) promote best evidence-based standards for the use of mindfulness research and its applications; and (3) facilitate discovery and professional development through grant giving.  AMRA serves as a professional resource to the sciences and humanities, practice communities, and the broader public on mindfulness from the perspective of contemplative practice.  Explore the following resources:

  • Measurement Tools: AMRA provides access to a list of scales that are used to measure mindfulness. Examples of measurement scales include the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS) and the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ).
  • Popular Press: AMRA tracks and posts current popular press stories from major news outlets in a blog format.
  • Reviews and Meta-Analysis: AMRA provides access to a list of selected publicly available research reviews and meta-analyses that report on the evidence base for mindfulness research and practice.
  • Scientific Bulletin-Mindfulness Research Monthly: AMRA provides access to a highly popular bulletin which serves to inform mindfulness research and practice. The Mindfulness Research Monthly, in publication since 2010, is the monthly research bulletin of the American Mindfulness Research Association. This publication provides a comprehensive collection of new research in the field in an effort to build awareness of and inform the latest scientific advances in mindfulness, and to gain new insights regarding the effects of mindfulness practice. Since its inaugural issue, individual subscription to Mindfulness Research Monthly remains free as a service to the public.

 

Black Lives Matter Meditation for Healing Racial Trauma (Nicole, C., 2016): Racial trauma exacts a psychological and physiological toll on people of color, and those involved in the Movement for Black Lives are especially vulnerable to hourly personal, emotional, and physical racist attacks. Guided meditation is one way to assist in calming a heightened state of distress, affirming one’s value and humanity, and recentering with love for Black people. This is a  17 minute guided meditation using mindfulness, affirmation, and metta (loving-kindness).

Free Guided Meditations (The Center for Kory Mindfulness, 2017):  The Koru Mindfulness® program was developed over the course of a decade by psychiatrists Holly Rogers, MD & Margaret Maytan, MD to bring the benefits of mindfulness to the college students they worked with at Duke University’s student counseling center.  Stream their free guided meditations to help you with your meditation practice. These free guided meditations will help anyone who is looking for guided help in their meditation practice.  To learn more about The Koru Mindfulness program click here.

Guided Imagery (The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 2017): Guided imagery practices can help students relax, improve sleep, prepare for surgery, experience greater clarity, compassion and gratitude and feel more calm, confident and comfortable. Ohio State Integrative Medicine offers the following free guided imagery recordings. Some specific meditations that align with the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion’s mission include:

  • Accessing Inner Intuition and Wisdom (Patrice Rancour, MS, RN, PMHCNS-BC): This “mountain meditation” exercise can help you access your inner intuition and wisdom to guide you on the road to health and healing.
  • Autogenic Training (Kathi Kemper, MD, MPH): Autogenic training is a simple practice of sitting or lying quietly while repeating a series of 6 phrases that elicit relaxation and ease. This guided practice is adapted from Autogenic Training by Dr. Kai Kermani. A 2002 meta-analysis of over 60 studies published on autogenic training concluded that this practice can offer significant benefits for people with headaches, including migraine headaches; mild-moderate hypertension; asthma; anxiety; depression; and insomnia.
  • Comfort in the Face of Pain and Loss (Patrice Rancour, MS, RN, PMHCNS-BC): This practice helps us re-connect with a lost loved one, developing compassion, patience, comfort, and warmth.
  • Easing Pain (Patrice Rancour, MS, RN, PMHCNS-BC): This meditation is adapted from Guided Meditations, Explorations, and Healings by Dr. Stephen Levine. It helps us notice our pain without judgment, breathing into it with curiosity, compassion, softness, and space. It can also be used as a mindfulness practice to change our relationship to pain and promote relaxation and ease.
  • Life Purpose (Patrice Rancour, MS, RN, PMHCNS-BC): Welcome home to your wise, inner self. This recording will guide you through symbolic inner rooms to take you deeper and deeper into your own true nature and lead you to the gift to yourself of remembering and affirming your life purpose to help you align your daily activities and become more effective and engaged.
  • Safe Place (Kathi Kemper, MD, MPH): Deeply imagining oneself in a safe, secure place helps create the same physiologic state as actually being in that space. Repeated practice can help promote restful sleep and balanced autonomic and immune function as well as mental clarity and calm, confidence.
  • Self-Awareness (Patrice Rancour, MS, RN, PMHCNS-BC): This practice is adapted from The Power of Kindness: Unexpected Benefits of Leading a Compassionate Life by Piero Ferrucci. This practice can also be considered a mindfulness practice–mindfulness of sensations, thoughts, and emotions–helping us know ourselves as awareness and peace.
  • Skill Master (Patrice Rancour, MS, RN, PMHCNS-BC): Would you like to master a special skill? Many athletes use guided imagery like this to help improve their skill and performance. Practicing this imagery can help you learn and practice a selected skill to help you gain confidence and mastery.

 

Heart-Centered Practices (The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 2017): Heart-centered practices can evoke healing and positive emotions, which broaden and build compassion, forgiveness, gratitude and loving-kindness (extending goodwill for safety, health, peace and happiness). Ohio State Integrative Medicine offers several free heart-centered recordings; some specific practices that align with the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion’s mission include:

  • Being Peace (Kathi Kemper, MD, MPH): This is a useful practice for clinicians and caregivers to promote a sense of peace, drawing from nature, filling the self, and expanding outward.
  • Forgiveness: Lovingkindness for Those Who Are Difficult (Kathi Kemper, MD, MPH): This guided experience helps build the ability to extend lovingkindness toward others toward whom we have negative feelings such as anger, hurt, fear, betrayal, or disgust. This is generally the practiced after mastering the ability to sustain lovingkindness toward someone else who is easy to love and others who are neutral. This is an advanced practice.
  • Lovingkindness for Loved Ones (Kathi Kemper, MD, MPH): This guided experience helps build the ability to extend lovingkindness toward loved ones, whether they be people, pets, plants, places, or experiences. This is generally the first practice before extending lovingkindness toward oneself, neutral people, or forgiveness toward those who have hurt us in some way.
  • Lovingkindness for Others (Kathi Kemper, MD, MPH): This guided experience helps build the ability to extend lovingkindness toward others toward whom we feel neutral, such as acquaintances or people we just happen to see in our daily lives. This is generally the practiced after mastering the ability to sustain lovingkindness toward someone else who is easy to love.
  • Lovingkindness for Self (Kathi Kemper, MD, MPH): This guided experience helps build the ability to extend lovingkindness toward ourselves. This is generally the practiced after mastering the ability to sustain lovingkindness toward someone else who is easy to love.

 

Unhelpful Thinking Habits (Vivyan, C., 2009): Over the years, we tend to get into unhelpful thinking habits such as those described below. We might favour some over others, and there might be some that seem far too familiar. Once you can identify your unhelpful thinking styles, you can start to notice them – they very often occur just before and during distressing situations. Once you can notice them, then that can help you to challenge or distance yourself from those thoughts, and see the situation in a different and more helpful way.