The John Carroll History Union (JCHU) is a student-run organization sponsored by the John Carroll Department of History. The JCHU aims to support and promote the discipline of history on campus, to encourage greater freedom of thought and expression among the student body, and to create a sense of historical consciousness among the JCU community.

The primary task of the JCHU is to run the John Carroll Students’ Forum, a series of free, open, unstructured, and student-based on-campus discussions. All are conducted in a Socratic-style with a no-hands-raised policy. Anybody can speak or say whatever he or she thinks. Opinions are welcome.

Below is our schedule for the Fall 2011 semester. Join us, empower yourself, and exercise your constitutional right to free speech! Free refreshments will be served!

Cyber Spaced?: Has tech oppressed us or liberated us?
22 Sept., 8 PM, Conference Room A203 in the Dolan Science Center, Moderator: Dr. Phil Metres
From Twitter to texting to Facebook to the iPhone, technology and new social media have clearly shaped our contemporary world. While both have served as an effective means to dislodge despots, as seen in the Arab Spring, there is also increasing concern about the loss of individual privacy. Taking these ideas into consideration, what does technology mean for us today? Has it oppressed us or liberated us?

The Economy… in Crisis: What does it mean for us, the students?
6 Oct., 8 PM, Conference Room A203 in the Dolan Science Center, Moderator: Dr. Andy Welki
The world has been recently rocked by a major financial crisis. As stocks decline, unemployment rises, and the Greek economy seeks deeper into the Aegean, one has to ask: what is the future of the economy? What does it mean for us, the students?

On the Marx?: What’s all the fuss about communism?
20 Oct., 8 PM, Conference Room A203 in the Dolan Science Center, Moderator: Dr. Michael Eng
During its existence, the Soviet Union was often referred to as “the evil empire.” However, communism, as an idea, cannot be easily dismissed as something negative. Lenin and his cohorts didn’t just get together one day at a café in St. Petersburg and decide to “be evil.” The history of communism, as a political ideology, is clearly more complex and not given to easy generalizations. Keeping that in mind, what was the appeal of communism? Why was it more appealing in some countries and not in others? And was Marx really right about capitalism?

Film Screening: In the Name of the Father (1993)
4 Nov., 8 PM, Donahue Auditorium of the Dolan Science Center, Moderator: Dr. Phil Metres
In this powerful film on the Northern Ireland conflict, a young man is forced to confess to a crime that he did not commit. Both he and his father are unjustly imprisoned as a British lawyer fights for their freedom. Starring Daniel Day Lewis, this film was nominated for 7 Oscars and won several international film awards. A post-screening discussion will be moderated by Dr. Phil Metres.

The Congress and Christ: What is the relationship between religion and state?
10 Nov. 8 PM, Conference Room A203 in the Dolan Science Center, Moderator: Dr. Joseph Kelly
How has the role of religion in politics changed over the years? Do religions still have a responsibility in shaping public policy? If so, what are their bounds and limitations in this regard?

Interested in learning more? E-mail us at carroll.history@yahoo.com.