You plagiarize when, in quoting phrases, sentences, or paragraphs, you fail to use quotation marks (or, for longer passages, blocked quotes) or when you fail to identify the source of each quotation.

You plagiarize when, in restating borrowed material in the original language or rewritten in your own words, you fail to identify the source of each borrowing. Proper source documentation requires that you provide at least the author, work, place and date of publication, and page number, or URL from the Internet.

You plagiarize when, in taking from another writer ideas or facts which cannot be considered common knowledge, you fail to identify the source of each borrowing, giving the author, work, place, and date of publication, and page number, or URL from the Internet.

You plagiarize when, without acknowledgment, you submit as your own work a paper written wholly or in part by some other person. It is wrong to claim as your own the words, ideas, or facts of another person, or an anonymous source such as the Internet.

You plagiarize when you use material you wrote in high school or for another class and turn it in as though it is new work written for a current course. Though it is your material, it was not produced as part of a course for which you submit it, and therefore can be considered a form of cheating. This is often referred to as self-plagiarism. The purpose of John Carroll University writing courses is to engage students in the act of writing and revision, not simply the production of finished papers. Recycling earlier works avoids a major component of a course.