Dedicated

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THE FOLLOWING ARE RETIRING FACULTY WHO HAVE CONTRIBUTED A COMBINED 330 YEARS OF SERVICE TO THE UNIVERSITY.

Brooks

Brooks

LeRoy Brooks, Professor of Finance
Having earned an MBA and a Ph.D. at Michigan State University, Roy taught at the University of Delaware and for 25 years at the university of South Carolina before being appointed the Edward J. and Louise E. Mellen Chair in Finance at John Carroll in 2001.

“Roy has been an absolute gem of a colleague,” says Andy Welki, Associate Professor of Economics. After a long and accomplished career elsewhere, Roy quickly became an integral part of our department and the Boler School. He embraces the culture and uniqueness of John Carroll; his pursuit of academic excellence from his students is laudatory … He serves as a mentor to students and colleagues alike. Roy’s perspectives and wisdom always provide fodder for serious consideration, as he always seeks to elevate and improve the Boler School.”

Roy taught courses in domestic and global corporate finance and investments topics, making extensive use of technology in his classes. In fact, he created a financial management simulation game, Fingame: The Financial Management Decision Game (Now Online Fingame 5.0) that has gone through several editions and is widely used in financial education.

Roy has authored more than 60 papers about mutual fund performance, valuation of corporate security issues, corporate control issues, determinants of corporate debt levels, and differences in valuation factors between public offerings and private placements that have appeared in Journal of Finance, Journal of Business, Review of Economics and Statistics, Management Science, Financial Management, Financial Review, Journal of Financial Research. Roy serves on the Financial Education Association Governing Board and is editor of its Journal of Financial Education.

Hayes

Hayes

Tom Hayes, Assistant Professor of English
Tom began teaching at John Carroll (where he also earned his M.A.) in 1966, and joined the full-time faculty in 1969 teaching in the Management and Marketing Department and in English before moving to the English Department in 1996. Throughout his long career here, Tom’s teaching reach has extended from First Year Seminar, Business Communication, and English Composition through British and American literature surveys, to special subjects in Catholic writers, Restoration and 18th Century Literature and Drama, to Dickens, the Victorian Novel, and American realism.

“Tom always impressed me as someone who had read everything and remembered it all; he was also able to teach just about anything and, as the list of courses he’s taught over the years suggests, often ended up doing just that,” says John McBratney, Chair of the Department of English, about Tom’s capacious knowledge and far-flung teaching service.

In terms of service, Tom has focused on faculty governance and departmental work, with extensive terms during both Faculty Forum and Faculty Council years, serving on the Handbook Committee, the Faculty Service Committee, the Faculty Forum Finance Committee, and the Compensation Committee.

“A university needs good faculty, and John Carroll has been fortunate to have had this good man on its faculty for the past 45 years,” says Bob Kolesar, Professor of Mathematics.

Hazelwood

Hazelwood

Don Hazelwood, Professor of Military Science
With a B.S. from the United States Military Academy and an MBA from SUNY Oswego, Don was appointed Chair of the Department of Military Science at John Carroll in 2010. He came to JCU from Fort Bragg, N.C., where he was an operations officer specializing in chemical defense operations for the special operations community. (That is, his family was at Fort Bragg during that time because he spent a good portion that assignment overseas in Iraq and Afghanistan.)

As the Military Science Department Chair, he fostered dynamic growth of the Army ROTC battalion, leading them to a No.1 national ranking, based on Cadet performance, all while earning a second Masters’ degree – this time in Accountancy. He leaves the unit this summer, retiring from the Army. But with several young children at home, he won’t spend too much time golfing or fishing in the coming months and years. Don plans to stay in the Cleveland area. John Carroll has gotten beneath his skin, along with the Cleveland Browns.

Kobyljanec

Kobyljanec

Kathleen Kobyljanec, Associate Librarian
Kathy, a John Carroll alumna, also earned a J.D. from Cleveland State University Marshall School of Law and an M.L.S. from Kent State University. She began working as an Assistant Librarian at Grasselli in 2002 and was promoted to Associate Librarian in 2004. Her duties at the library included serving as the Head of Access Services, working as a liaison to the Political Science and then Biology departments, and managing the print subscriptions to serials for the university.

During her 11 years of service to John Carroll, Kathy taught in the First Year Seminar in the years when the theme was “Responsibility and Social Justice.” A horsewoman herself, Kathy had a keen interest in animal welfare and taught a course about animal ethics at John Carroll twice. With regard to professional service, Kathy was active in the NASIG (North American Serials Interest Group), including serving as Conference Editor and maintaining calendars for the Newsletter and the website. Kathy had a reputation for hiring excellent people, many of whom are carrying on her good work.

Kolesar

Kolesar

Bob Kolesar, Associate Professor of History
Bob came to John Carroll as a visiting assistant professor in 1989 and joined the department as a full- time, tenure-track faculty member in 1993. Chiefly interested in late-19th century United States history, Bob has taught a wide variety of courses remarkable for their interdisciplinary reach, including courses about race and sex in American culture, the U.S./Mexico border, and several iterations of First Year Seminar. Bob has served the University in many capacities. He was department chair from 2001 until 2005, led the Honors Program from 2005 to 2011, and chaired FYS during its “Frontiers and Borders” phase. In keeping with his work on borderlands and social issues, Bob published a case study analysis of the tensions within, and design necessities of, nonprofit community programs titled People of Good Will: Service, Development, and Education in the Work of Los Ninos, 1974-1990.

“Bob’s creativity has always amazed me,” says his colleague Maria Marsilli. “His capacity to wonder, explore, and engage new intellectual pursuits with youthful enthusiasm will remain one of the most cherished lessons I learned from him.”

As anybody who knows him is aware, Bob abhors ceremony and hoopla of any kind. He has asked that no great notice be made about his retirement, and the History Department will, of course, respect his wishes. His candor and commitment will be missed by his colleagues in the History Department and throughout the university.

Miller

Miller

Joe Miller, Professor of Communication
Joe has given John Carroll 53 years of dedicated service as a faculty member in the Department of Communication and as Chair of the Department, Acting Chair in Physics and Philosophy, Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, interim Graduate Dean, and Director of Summer Sessions. A John Carroll alum, Joe completed his Ph.D. at Case Western Reserve University and joined the faculty at JCU as an instructor in 1961.

Specializing in public speaking, Joe has regularly taught Speech Communication, Principles of Oral Communication, and Business Public Speaking. John Spencer points out Joe Miller seems to remember everyone who ever took one of his classes (including Pete Bernardo ’67, ’72G, Senior Director, Philanthropic Relations) and to be comfortable schmoozing with just about anyone.”

Outside of JCU, Joe has consulted for area business organizations in the area of business and professional speaking, and in 1975 was appointed to the President’s executive exchange program in Washington, D.C. Joe has served extensively as a peer reviewer for the Commission on Higher Education, the accrediting body for the North Central Association, chairing teams of accreditors at institutions in the Midwest states. Because of that experience, Joe was instrumental in preparing John Carroll
for its most recent accreditation visit in February of this year.

Winner of the Distinguished Faculty Award in 1983, Joe’s lasting contributions and influence are clear in the words of his colleague, Jackie Schmidt: “For 53 years, you have motivated and inspired JCU students, faculty and alumni. Your knowledge, humor, and integrity have left a lasting impact on all of us. Thank you.”

Nevin

Nevin

Tom Nevin, Professor of Classical Studies
A prolific and acclaimed biographer, Tom is the author of Simone Weil: Portrait of A Self-Exiled Jew, which was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in 1992. He also published Irving Babbitt: An Intellectual Study (winner of the Alpha Sigma Nu Award in 1985); Ernst Junger and Germany, Into The Abyss 1914-1945; and Therese of Lisieux: God’s Gentle Warrior (Honorable Mention, Religion Association of American Publishers’ Professional and Scholarly Publishing Awards, 2006). He has also published articles and essays about these figures as well as about Dante.

Graduating from the University of Colorado with a major in History, Tom went on to earn Masters’ degrees in History and in Classics, as well as a Ph.D. in History from the University of Wisconsin before joining the faculty at John Carroll as a Visiting Assistant Professor in 1980. Tom was appointed Director of the Honors Program in 1985 and served in that capacity until 1990. As a faculty member in the Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Cultures, Tom taught Greek, Latin, and Classical Studies courses. He might be remembered best by his own words, from his Therese of Lisieux: “We are back to the question of how to read and live the immanence of life.”

Schubeck

Schubeck

Tom Schubeck, S.J., Professor of Religious Studies
A member of the Society of Jesus since 1957 and ordained in 1968, Tom had a diversity of teaching and pastoral experiences and a broad education before arriving at John Carroll in 1989. With a B.A. in Latin and an M.A. in theology from Loyola University of Chicago, plus an M.S. in biology from the University of Detroit and a Ph.D. in social ethics from the University of Southern California, Tom taught biology, English, and Latin at Loyola Academy in Wilmette, Illinois; moral theology at Loyola University of Chicago; and religious studies at University of Detroit. Ph.D. in hand, Tom served on the faculty at the Jesuit School of Theology at Berkeley where he was Chair of Pastoral Theology from 1977 to 1979. He was also Director of Novices at the Detroit Province of the Society of Jesus and Visiting Fellow at Woodstock Theological Center of Georgetown University.

As a member of the Department of Theology and Religious Studies at John Carroll, Tom has taught courses about Christian social ethics, including liberation theology and ethics in Latin America, and the relation of love to justice. He also served as Department Chair from 1995 to 1999.

Author of Liberation Ethics: Sources, Models, and Norms and Love That Does Justice, Tom has published numerous articles for academic and popular audiences about liberation theology and justice. He was selected for John Carroll’s Distinguished Faculty Award in 2001 and inducted into the John Carroll chapter of Alpha Sigma Nu as an honorary member in 2002.

“From ministering to local prisoners to working on Bishop Pilla’s Church in the City initiative, from serving on countless university committees to writing powerfully on the love that does justice, from challenging students in thoughtful reflection on liberation ethics to dialogues with Larry Cima on economic justice, Tom Schubeck has been the very embodiment of the university’s mission,” writes colleague John Spencer. “We are all in your debt.”

Spencer

Spencer

John Spencer, Professor of Religious Studies
John came to John Carroll in 1977 with a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Berkeley, Masters degrees from Pacific School of Religion and the University of Chicago, and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in Hebrew Bible and Ancient Near Eastern Studies. With teaching experience from St. Xavier College in Chicago and Oklahoma City University, John has offered a range of courses in Biblical Studies, Religious Studies, and related history and archaeology, as well as interdisciplinary, team-taught courses for the Honors First Year Seminar while he was Director of the Honors Program from 1990 to 2005. In addition to his service as Honors Director, John served as Chair of the Religious Studies Department from 2007 to 2012. In 1991, he received the Distinguished Faculty Award.

John’s publications accordingly have dealt with bible studies, biblical archaeology, and the history of the ancient Eastern Mediterranean, with an emphasis on material culture, reflecting his field work about the Tell el-Hesi and the Ashkelon Archaeologcal Expeditions in Israel. Just this year, John and his co-editors published Material Culture Matters: Essays on the Archaeology of the Southern Levant in Honor of Seymour Gitin. In terms of professional service, John has served on the Board of Trustees of the W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research since 1987 (often as an officer and most frequently as Treasurer), served on the Board of Trustees of the American Schools of Oriental Research from 1997 to 2003, and has been President of the Cleveland Archaeological Society since 2007.

“For 37 years, John Spencer has served John Carroll with his distinctive mix of professionalism, compassion, and good humor,” says Ed Hahnenberg, the Jack and Mary Jane Breen Chair in Catholic Systematic Theology. “His rigorous expectations for written work and his challenging questions to students always came with a gentle smile and genuine concern, qualities that brought out the best in anyone lucky enough to get into one of his classes. We’ll miss him as a teacher, scholar, and colleague.”

Spitznagel

Spitznagel

Carl Spitznagel, Professor of Mathematics
Carl joined the John Carroll University Department of Mathematics in 1972, just after completing his Ph.D. in abstract algebra at the University of Kentucky, following an A.B. at Holy Cross. Carl has played a central role in the growth of the department in many ways. He has taught a wide variety of courses, ranging from applied statistics to abstract algebra and helped develop the M.A. program for high school mathematics teachers. He also served as the chair of the department from 1987 to 1995.

Carl has been a very dedicated teacher, earning praise from many students for his ability to explain complicated topics in simple terms. His classroom approach has constantly evolved during his time here, bringing in the newest pedagogical ideas along with cutting-edge technology. Carl has been among the early adopters among mathematicians for such innovations as graphing calculators, calculator-based laboratories, and several generations of computer algebra systems (Derive, Maple, GeoGebra, among others). His dedication to teaching was recognized with the College of Arts and Sciences Lucrezia Culicchia Award for Teaching Excellence in 1998.

In recent years, Carl’s scholarly endeavors have involved research into mathematical pedagogy. He has published frequently about using new ways to use technology and software in teaching difficult mathematical concepts to today’s students.

Throughout his time at JCU, Carl has been a committed faculty member, always stepping up to do whatever was necessary to help keep the university running well. He has served on almost every faculty committee (often as chair), and in his quiet, polite way has always pushed to ensure things were done properly. Every member of the faculty will remember instances of Carl asking insightful (and often incisive) questions when new programs have been discussed at faculty meetings. When the JCU faculty moved to a new governance system in the mid 1980s, Carl was asked to write the Faculty Forum Constitution and to serve as its first Chairman. To this day, the Carl Spitznagel Gavel is part of the materials that incoming faculty Council Chairs receive. Students and colleagues alike will miss him greatly.

Stenson

Stenson

David Stenson, Associate Professor of Mathematics
David joined the John Carroll University Department of Mathematics in 1972, shortly after completing his Ph.D. in topological algebra at the University of Massachusetts, following his B.S. from JCU. A flexible and wide-ranging teacher, David has taught a variety of courses at John Carroll, both in his specialization of topology and abstract algebra and to meet the broader needs of the department, such as Applied Mathematics and Elementary Statistics. David’s Math and Computer Science colleagues have long described him as a consummate teacher, the ultimate compliment for a JCU faculty member, and the popularity of his courses bears out this appraisal. He is consistently praised by students for his clarity of exposition and for his dry wit.

In the mid 1980s, he helped the department transition from solely Mathematics to Mathematics and Computer Science, and as the department began that move, he added to his expertise by doing two years’ worth of coursework at the Institute for Retraining in Computer Science at SUNY Pottsdam to aid the planning and implementation of a strategic hiring expansion.

Once the Computer Science expansion was fully staffed, David returned to the math side and in more recent years has served as Associate Chair, coordinating the department’s graduate programs and the tutoring center for the last decade.

It is worthy of note that in his years as Associate Chair, David has helped more than 100 high school mathematics teachers complete M.A. degrees. He will be greatly missed by his students, colleagues, and friends at JCU.


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