Summer Research Fellowship Recipients

This fellowship supports faculty research during Summer 2014 on a competitive basis. It provides a stipend for a summer research project with the expectation of a submission to a high-quality, referred journal or an equivalent standard of intellectual contribution.

Swearingen

Swearingen

Colin Swearingen, Department of Political Science, will explore the potential impact of presidential campaign field offices on an Ohio community’s election results by analyzing the distance between a community and the closest field office(s).

Denise Ben-Porath, Department of Psychology, will conduct a study investigating attentional biases to weight-related stimulus pictures among subjects with anorexia nervosa and control subjects, who are defined as undergraduate, college-aged students who do not have an eating disorder.

Jayme Stayer, Department of English, will finish writing the fifth chapter of his book manuscript, Becoming T. S. Eliot, in which he tracks the rhetorical development of T. S. Eliot’s poetry.

Compton-Engle

Compton-Engle

Gwen Compton-Engle, Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Cultures, will make final revisions to a book manuscript about the use of costume in fifth-century BCE Athenian comedy.

Greg DiLisi, Department of Education and Allied Studies, will use the micro-gravity environment of NASA’s 727 parabolic aircraft to test the dynamics of liquid bridges under varying total body acceleration as a function of bridge slenderness, support size, axial versus radial orientation, and the surface tension-to-density ratio of the test fluid.

Dyck

Dyck

Jeff Dyck, Department of Physics, will perform the first measurements of thermal conductivity on the semiconductor zinc germanium nitride, a prospective material for future solid-state lighting technology, and develop the techniques needed to conduct the measurements.

Jeff Johansen, Department of Biology, will coauthor two chapters about the cyanobacteria of North America for the second edition of the technical reference text Freshwater Algae of North America: Ecology and Classification.

Koch

Koch

Linda Koch, Department of Art History, will uncover the remaining layers of meaning of a Renaissance painting of circa 1459 representing the Mystic Lamb in the palace of the Medici family in Florence. The investigation will include nuanced meanings of specific details of the depiction and the thematic relationship of the image to the Procession of the Magi frescoes within the palace’s chapel. Delving into the image is likely to yield additional clues about the family’s political maneuvering through visual imagery.

Martin

Martin

Mike Martin, Department of Biology, will update protocols used to determine human ABO blood type via non-invasive means to be less labor intensive and adapted for use with newer technology.

George Bilgere, Department of English, will write and revise of a collection of poems that will develop into a book.

Bo Liu, Department of Art History, will study the seventh-century Chinese painting “Thirteen Emperors” and how the artist was able to insert commentary messages into the kings’ seemingly formulaic portraits. Many aspects of the painting are insufficiently understood, including the identities of the kings, the meaning behind the selection of the individual kings, and the motivation of the artist.

Schmidt

Schmidt

Jackie Schmidt, Department of Communications and Theatre Arts, will study similarities and differences of the friendships that exist between close and business friends in Russia, Croatia, and the United States. The results will be compared to earlier studies about friendship expectations in these cultures to determine if there is a match between what one expects and what one will do for friends.

Pamela Vanderzalm, Department of Biology, will conduct research to further understand how epithelial cells regulate cell death versus growth and division. This has important implications for cancer biology because about 85% of tumors are epithelial in origin and the genes in this study are conserved between Drosophila and humans.

Rosenthal

Rosenthal

Debby Rosenthal, Department of English, will contribute an essay to the forthcoming volume The Transnational Histories of Uncle Tom’s Cabin under contract with the University of Michigan Press. Her essay will discuss the recent Iranian theatrical production of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, which was written and directed by renowned Iranian playwright and puppeteer Behrooz Gharibpour, as a political and aesthetic response to the disenfranchise- ment of black Americans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina.

Catellier

Catellier

Jennifer Allen Catellier, Department of Communications and Theatre Arts, will assess the effectiveness of health messages encouraging college students to eat healthy and exercise. Her study will examine whether positive and negative messages influence the emotional associations with diet and exercise and if this leads to engaging in healthy behaviors.

Phil Metres, Department of English, will complete a book project of translated interviews and supplemental poems tentatively titled Conversations after the Fall. The book will offer a perspective of the transition of Russian life and poetry from the Soviet era into post-communism, democracy, and capitalism.

Yost

Yost

John Yost, Department of Psychology, will use the context of the 2012 presidential election to examine the impact of a worldview threat on the perception of one’s own mortality as measured by the predicted age of one’s own death. This is the inverse of the Terror Management Theory, which asserts humans are conscious of their inevitable death and, therefore, seek self-esteem to buffer themselves from death anxiety through upholding and defending cultural worldviews.


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