The Department of Counseling offers master’s degrees in Clinical Mental Health Counseling and School Counseling. Both programs are CACREP-accredited.

  • The Clinical Mental Health Counseling program is 60 semester hours and meets the academic requirements for licensure as a Professional Clinical Counselor (PCC) in the State of Ohio.
  • The School Counseling program is 48 semester hours and leads to licensure in the State of Ohio as a school counselor.

The Department also offers a certificate in Spiritual Wellness and Counseling and a concentration in Substance Use Disorders. For students interested in pursuing doctoral-level training, the Department offers a course in Preparation for Doctoral Studies.

Accreditation

In 2013, John Carroll’s program received the maximum eight-year re-accreditation. This fact reflects the Department’s commitment to excellence and demonstrates that the Department of Counseling meets or exceeded all accreditation standards. It also sets the program apart from others, as over half of all CACREP-accredited programs receive only a two-year re-accreditation.

Gaining and maintaining CACREP accreditation is essential for any counseling program, especially in Ohio.  In 2014, the Ohio State Legislature passed legislation requiring all counseling programs to be CACREP-accredited by 2018.  In addition, several insurance carriers will reimburse only for counselors who earned degrees from CACREP-accredited programs.

Vital Statistics

In the 2016/2017 academic year, the total enrollment for the two master’s programs was 126: 104 in Clinical Mental Health Counseling and 22 in School Counseling. Of the students admitted to the fall 2014 cohort, 94% completed the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program in the expected three-year time period and 100% completed the School Counseling program in the expected three-year time period. The programs had 48 graduates from summer 2016 to spring 2017: 42 in Clinical Mental Health Counseling and 6 in School Counseling. Our graduates have consistently achieved high scores and high pass rates on licensing examinations. During this academic year, the graduates of the Clinical Mental Health Program had a pass rate of 86% on the NCE examination. School Counseling graduates achieved a 100% passing rate for school counselor licensure. Our graduates also have been extremely successful in obtaining employment in positions in recognized occupations for which they were trained. For Clinical Mental Health Counseling graduates the employment rate was 80%. School Counseling graduates had a 50% employment rate. Both of the figures for Clinical Mental Health and School Counseling are complicated by the fact that several students are looking for employment only within their agency/school or in a specific geographic area.

Summer 2015-Spring 2016 John Carroll University Department of Counseling’s Annual Report

Program Learning Outcomes

Counseling Program Student Learning Outcomes: Core Sequence

After completing this program, the student will be able to:

1.   Demonstrate an understanding of the major principles of research design and program evaluation.  Evaluate research reports for methodological and statistical appropriateness.  (CG 509)

2.  Apply basic counseling and facilitative communication skills in individual and small group settings.  (CG 562 & CG 535, CG 591/592, CG 596/CG598)

3.  Demonstrate an understanding of counseling theories, and evidence-based counseling approaches.  Appropriately apply various theoretical approaches when working with clients and/or students. (CG 561, CG 573, CG 591/592, CG 596/CG598)

4.  Demonstrate understanding of the psychosocial foundations of human development, behavior and learning, and apply that knowledge when working with clients and/or students.  (CG 505, CG 591/592, CG 596/CG598)

5.  Counsel and advocate for individuals from diverse social, cultural, sexual orientation and economic backgrounds with an awareness of how discrimination and societal expectations can impact healthy psychological development and the counseling process.  (CG 563, CG 591/592, CG 596/CG598)

6.  Demonstrate knowledge of group process and procedures by describing and analyzing group process, and by applying basic techniques of group counseling. (CG 535, CG 591/592, CG 596/CG598)

7.  Conduct a developmentally appropriate career exploration and assessment that demonstrates an understanding of career development theory and the career counseling process.  (CG 531, CG 591/592, CG 596/CG598)

8.  Demonstrate the ability to select and evaluate assessment instruments for possible use with clients and/or students. (ED 530, CG 591/592, CG 596/CG598)

9.  Model legal and ethical understanding of the ASCA or ACA ethical standards.  Demonstrate knowledge of the appropriate ethical code and of the ethical decision making process.

Counseling Program Student Learning Outcomes: Clinical Mental Health Counseling

After completing this program, the student will be able to:

1.  Identify as a clinical mental health counselor who is knowledgeable about the history and development of the clinical mental health counseling profession, is aware of the challenges facing the profession, and is prepared to advocate for the profession.

2.  Assess, evaluate, and diagnose clients using assessment instruments and the DSM-IV-TR. (CG 570, CG 571, CG 572, CG 592, CG 596)

3. Determine, based on the assessment and diagnosis, an appropriate treatment plan for clients. (CG 573, CG 592, CG 596)

4.  Implement interventions and treatment plan, and continuously assess the effectiveness of the intervention. (CG 592, CG 596)

Counseling Program Student Learning Outcomes: School Counseling

After completing this program, the student will be able to:

1.  Identify as a school counselor who is knowledgeable about the history and development of the school counseling profession, is aware of the challenges facing the profession, and is prepared to advocate for the profession.

2.  Plan a developmentally appropriate school counseling program that supports academic, personal/social, and career development.  The program should be modeled on the ASCA standards and should take into consideration the specific needs of a particular school setting.

3.  Communicate, collaborate and consult with school age students, their families, school staff, and community agency representatives to promote a safe, healthy, and effective learning environment.

4.  Implement a system of on-going program evaluation by establishing a framework for record- keeping and continuous feedback from program stakeholders.