Counseling, Social Work, Marriage and Family Therapy,

Chemical Dependency and Psychology Continuing Education Programs

Cost: $25/hour. $22.50/hour for alumni. $25/course for students.

Please note that if you register at the student rate of $25 for a course, no certificate will be issued for continuing education hours.

Refunds are given in form of a workshop credit for up to one year..

John Carroll University offers free, convenient, and close parking!

Fall 2018 JCU Continuing Education Flier

 

Recovery from Infidelity in Marriage
6 CE hours or 6 NBCC hours

OPA: Professional Conduct
OCSWMFT
*OCDP: (C7 – Prevention Strategies 2 hours, C8 – Treatment Planning 2 hours, C9 – Legal & Ethical Issues in Counseling 2 hours) OR (P2 – Prevention Education & Service Delivery 1.5 hours, P3 – Communication 1.5 hours, P6 – Professional Growth & Responsibility 1.5 hours, P7 – Ethics for Prevention 1.5 hours)
Instructor: Christine Elliott, Ph.D.

Friday 9/7/2018  •  9 a.m.–4 p.m.


Marriage and Family Therapy: A Brain-Based Approach
OPA

OCSWMFT

*OCDP: C5 – Relationship Counseling with Addicted Populations 3 hours OR R1 – Field Related Other 3 hours
Instructor: Brando Tupaz, LPCC-S

Friday 9/14/2018  •  9 a.m.–noon


Counseling Supervision in a Group Format: Techniques and Ethical Challenges
OPA: Ethics

OCSWMFT: Ethics and Supervision
*OCDP: C3 – Group Process & Techniques Working with Addicted Populations 1.5 hours and C9 – Legal & Ethical Issues in Counseling 1.5 hours OR R1 – Field Related Other 3 hours
Instructor: Paula J. Britton, Ph.D., LPCC-S

Friday 9/21/2018  •  9 a.m.–noon


Clinical Supervision: May the Force Be with You

OPA

OCSWMFT: Supervision
Instructor: Billie Gilliam, LPCC-S, LICDC-CS
Friday 9/28/2018  •  9 a.m.–noon


Healing the Defiant Child and Teenager: Brain-Based Approaches

OPA

OCSWMFT
*OCDP: C5 – Relationship Counseling with Addicted Populations 3 hours OR R1 – Field Related Other 3 hours
Instructor: Brando Tupaz, LPCC-S
Friday 10/12/2018  •  9 a.m.–noon


Resistance is Futile: Dealing with Difficult Clients

OPA

OCSWMFT
*OCDP: C2 – Counseling Procedures & Strategies with Addicted Populations 3 hours OR P3 – Communication 3 hours OR S1 – Counselor Development 3 hours
Instructor: Vincent Giammarco, MA, LPCC-S, LCDC III
Friday 10/26/2018  •  9 a.m.–noon


Spirituality as a Resource in Psychotherapy

6 CE hours or 6 NBCC hours
OPA: Ethics and Cultural Competency

OCSWMFT

*OCDP: C7 – Prevention Strategies 6 hours OR P2 – Prevention Education & Service Delivery 6 hours OR S1 – Counselor Development 6 hours

Instructor: Christine Elliott, Ph.D.
Friday 11/2/2018  •  9 a.m.–4 p.m.


Psychopharmacology
OPA

OCSWMFT

*OCDP: C1 – Theories of Addiction/Addiction Knowledge 1.5 hours and C6 – Pharmacology 1.5 hours OR R1 – Field Related Other 3 hours

Instructor: Billie Gilliam, LPCC-S, LICDC-CS
Friday 11/16/2018  •  9 a.m.–noon


The Ethics of Counseling Diverse Populations
OPA: Ethics, Cultural Competency, and Professional Conduct

OCSWMFT: Ethics

*OCDP: C9 – Legal & Ethical Issues in Counseling OR S2 – Professional & Ethical Standards 3 hours OR R1 – Field Related Other 3 hours

Instructor: Cecile Brennan, Ph.D., LPCC-S, LSC
Friday 11/30/2018  •  9 a.m.–noon


*OCDP course approvals are currently pending.



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John Carroll University Office of Continuing Education is an approved provider for the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker, and Marriage and Family Therapists Board (provider #RCS030604).  John Carroll University has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP Number 4064. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified.  John Carroll University is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.  CE hours are also available for nursing professionals–the Ohio Board of Nursing recognizes educational activities that have been approved for other disciplines. John Carroll University is approved by the Ohio Psychological Association – MCE Program to offer continuing education for psychologists. John Carroll University [tax id: 00PO-340714681], maintains responsibility for the program.  John Carroll University is an approved course provider for the Ohio Chemical Dependency Professionals Board (50-21692.)

Participating Ohio psychologists’ signatures are required on the day of the class. All workshops are offered in conjunction with the Department of Counseling at John Carroll University.


Fall 2018 JCU Continuing Education Flier


Course Descriptions and Instructor Biographies:

Recovery from Infidelity in Marriage

The discovery of infidelity in the marital relationship is one of the most devastating crises a couple can face. Although it may at first seem that the marriage is damaged beyond repair, there actually is a path through the pain and betrayal, toward understanding of how the relationship was vulnerable to an affair, and finally to forgiveness, rebuilding and renewal of the marriage. This seminar will provide a full understanding of practical and insightful methods to help a couple through this difficult journey of recovery.

Upon completion of the workshop:

  1. Participants will be able to describe the stages in recovery from infidelity, including discovery, decision, admission, learning for understanding, and rebuilding. Participants will learn methods to address these stages in therapy.
  2. Participants will gain understanding of the roles, typical reactions, and recovery tasks of both the unfaithful spouse and the betrayed spouse.
  3. Participants will learn the steps involved in restoring trust and moving toward forgiveness in the marriage, after infidelity.

Christine Elliott, Ph.D. is a Licensed Psychologist with more than 25 years of experience as a clinician in private practice and hospital settings. She practices independently at LifeStream, LLC. She earned her PhD in Clinical Psychology from Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Elliott is a Lecturer in the Department of Counseling at John Carroll University, where she has taught graduate students how to integrate spiritual beliefs into counseling practice. Dr. Elliott regularly leads Continuing Education seminars for Cleveland State University, EMERGE Counseling, and The City Mission of Cleveland. She is also a consultant and trainer for mental health organizations and private practices.

Marriage and Family Therapy: A Brain-Based Approach

This course focuses on how the brain provides a greater understanding of the self and family relationships. Family members and the dynamics between them can significantly influence our emotional regulation and social behavior because the human brain is a social brain — a social organ — shaped by experience. Advances in neuroscience have expanded our understanding of family dynamics through fundamental processes such as attachment and compassion, and the discovery of mirror neurons has greatly expanded how we understand the neural interconnection of human relationships. Learn the basic principles of neuroscience and interpersonal neurobiology, how brain development is shaped by family experiences, how brain architecture and processes offer opportunities to develop and evolve healthy family relationships, and how to coach parents on these brain-based techniques and strategies.

Upon completion of the workshop:

    1. Participants will learn basic principles of Neuroscience and Interpersonal Neurobiology.
    2. Participants will learn how brain development is shaped by family experiences.
    3. Participants will learn how brain architecture and processes offer opportunities to develop and evolve healthy family relationships.
    4. Participants will learn how to coach parents on these brain-based techniques and strategies.

 

Brando Tupaz, LPCC-S began his career in mental health counseling in the early 1990’s. He studied psychology and nutrition at The Ohio State University. He earned his Master’s degree from John Carroll University. The University of Akron provided his doctoral training and education. His clinical practice includes working with children, adolescents, and adults experiencing a variety of mental health conditions, treating dysfunctional family dynamics, couples counseling, and parent coaching. He also serves as a mental health consultant for various school districts. He is currently in his 18th year as adjunct faculty at John Carroll University teaching courses in Play Therapy, Family Therapy, Clinical Diagnosis, Counseling Children, and Sport Psychology in addition to supervising Counselor Trainees. He also teaches Biopsychology and Cognitive Psychology at Notre Dame College.

Counseling Supervision in a Group Format: Techniques and Ethical Challenges

This workshop offers supervisors some models and interventions that could be integrated into a group supervision format. Participants will be invited to participate in some of the activities as well as discuss potential difficulties and ethical complications of the model.

Workshop Objectives:

    1. Participants will learn some current models of providing group supervision.
    2. Participants will learn and practice some group supervision interventions.
    3. Participants will explore ethical challenges and strategies that can come up in a group supervision format.

 

Paula J. Britton, Ph.D., LPCC-S For 25 years she has been a professor of Clinical Mental Health Counseling at John Carroll University (JCU.) She is a licensed psychologist and a PCC-S, with over twenty years of diverse clinical experience including an administrator and supervisor in a family service agency, a project director of a large research grant and maintains a small private practice. She has given over 100 local, state, and national professional presentations and workshops in the areas of supervision and ethics as well as numerous publications. Currently, she is a supervisor of: Master level therapists in private practice, Doctoral Interns for Clinical Mental Health Counseling, and Practicum/Internship students in Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program at JCU.

Clinical Supervision: May the Force Be with You

Understanding essential principles of clinical supervision, different models of supervision, and how dual relationships impact the clinical relationship.

Upon completion of the workshop:

  1. Participants will be able to understand the clinical value of supervision.
  2. Participants will be able to identify developmental stages of clinicians.
  3. Participants will understand how to navigate dual roles in the clinical relationships.

Billie Gilliam, LPCC-S, LICDC-CS earned her Master’s Degree in Clinical Mental Health from John Carroll University in University Heights, OH. She earned her bachelor’s degree in psychology from Cleveland State University. Billie is dually licensed as a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor and Licensed Independent Chemical Dependency counselor. Billie has received additional trainings and certifications in addictions, psychopharmacology, physiology and others. Additionally, she teaches psychology and chemical dependency courses at a local community college. Billie has professional publications that include relational cultural theory, case studies, and adolescent relationships. Her philosophy of treatment includes an integrated systems approach that is strength-focused. She treats individuals, couples and families with a variety of issues that include: depression, anxiety, relationship issues, women’s issues, substance abuse and dependence.

Healing the Defiant Child and Teenager: Brain-Based Approaches

Refusing to do what’s been asked. Continuing to play a video game despite being told to do homework or clean your room. This is just the tip of the iceberg of parents’ woes and struggles with a child or teenager whose behavior is best described as defiant and oppositional. Thankfully, brain-based approaches rooted in neuroscience have offered a new and refreshing approach to not only manage but eliminate these behaviors. This program will demonstrate to parents and child, adolescent, and family counselors how to implement these approaches.

Workshop Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn basic principles of Neuroscience and Neurocounseling.
  2. Participants will learn how brain processes offer opportunities to respond to defiant and oppositional behavior that works towards eliminating the behavior.
  3. Participants will learn brain-based techniques and interventions to counsel children and adolescents.
  4. Participants will learn how to coach parents on these brain-based techniques and intervention

Brando Tupaz, LPCC-S

Resistance is Futile: Dealing with Difficult Clients Dealing with difficult clients in-session is never an easy task. Resistance is usually a characteristic of certain personality disorders or those who engage in self-destructive or self-injurious behaviors, domestic abusers, bullies, gang members, and even in couples therapy. This workshop will help attendees maneuver through this resistance with hopes of moving clients to be productive in the therapeutic environment.

Workshop Objectives:

  1. Participants will help in developing a working definition of a “difficult client” by discussing characteristics, perceptions, stereotypes, and personality types mostly associated with this problematic population.
  2. Participants will identify ways of moving with destructive power or resistance to constructive power or production.
  3. Participants will evaluate the use of Motivational Interviewing when moving a client from resistance to ambivalence to receptiveness to change.
  4. Participants will discuss CBT and REBT as two theories with techniques useful in breaking through difficult clients and review defense mechanisms that may be seen in-session.
  5. Participants will examine case studies and openly discuss other alternatives or approaches that may be used with dealing with resistant clients.

Vincent Giammarco, MA, LPCC-S, LCDC III is a Forensic Counselor who has worked extensively with adolescents and adults who have been incarcerated, on probation/parole, or otherwise had been court-ordered for alcohol/drug, mental health, and/or sex offender treatment and rehabilitation. Over his 19-year career to date, he has worked at a variety of entry-level, mid-management, and upper level positions for state government agencies. Vincent has held positions as an Alcohol/Drug Counselor in Lorain County; a Probation Officer with the City of Cleveland Municipal Court; a Social Worker Supervisor and Mental Health Administrator for the Ohio Department of Mental Health; a Parole Officer and Parole Services Supervisor with the Ohio Adult Parole Authority; and currently is the Mental Health Administrator for the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction at the Lorain Correctional Institution.

Vincent received his Bachelor’s Degree of Science in Psychology in 1994 with a minor concentration in Criminal Justice and his Master’s Degree of Arts in Community Counseling in 1999—both from John Carroll University. He is currently a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor with the Training Supervision Designation and is a Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor in the State of Ohio.

Spirituality as a Resource in Psychotherapy

This seminar is designed for mental health professionals who are intrigued by the possibilities for integrating spirituality into their work in psychotherapy, but don’t know where to start. Participants will develop skills in: assessing spiritual beliefs even when they have minimal personal knowledge about specific religious groups, distinguishing between healthy and unhealthy expressions of spiritual beliefs, and recognizing the impact of their own beliefs and values on the process of psychotherapy. They will learn how to be open and welcoming of their clients’ spiritual beliefs and experiences, as well as developing knowledge and practice of specific interventions which utilize spiritual beliefs. The will also discover the uniquely effective power of spiritual approaches in addressing several life challenges which are difficult to confront using only traditional psychological methods.

Upon completion of the workshop:

  1. Learn six spiritual practices which clients can utilize to boost their progress in psychotherapy.
  2. Develop knowledge of several spiritual challenges which are not addressed by traditional psychological methods.
  3. Learn over 25 specific techniques for working with members of particular religious groups.
  4. Find practical guidelines for assessing when religious beliefs may become pathological influences.
  5. Develop awareness of the ethical issues involved in integrating spirituality and psychotherapy.

Christine Elliott, Ph.D.

Psychopharmacology

Understanding basics of pharmacology concepts such as interactions, synergy, therapeutic index, efficacy and effectiveness; Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics; medication assistant treatment methods; and withdrawal and its impact on the brain.

Upon completion of the workshop participants will gain a basic understanding of pharmacology fundamentals.

Billie Gilliam, LPCC-S, LICDC-CS

The Ethics of Counseling Diverse Populations

Mental health professionals need to learn how to approach individuals from diverse cultural and social groups with cultural and ethical sensitivity. But learning about diverse populations is just the starting point. Understanding how to implement the ethical code, while also acknowledging cultural differences, is at the heart of this presentation. How should a counselor proceed if the ethical code is in conflict with a person’s culture? What actions should be taken when an accepted cultural practice diverges from core counseling principles or even from basic human rights? For practitioners to be effective and ethical, these issues must be considered. This presentation will offer answers to these questions.

Upon completion of the workshop participants will be able to:

  1. Apply the Ethical Code and various counseling competencies when counseling diverse populations.
  2. Reflect on the intersection of professional values, personal values, and cultural values and practices in the counseling process.
  3. Discern how to proceed when cultural values appear to conflict with core counseling principles
  4. Develop a decision-making process aimed at ensuring ethical practice with diverse populations.

Cecile Brennan, Ph.D., LPCC-S, LSC is a licensed professional clinical counselor with a supervisory designation, a school counselor, a counselor educator and a clinician in private practice. She is currently an associate professor in the Department of Counseling at John Carroll University. During her time at John Carroll, she developed a certificate program in Spiritual Wellness & Counseling and assisted in implementing the Substance Use Disorder concentration. Dr. Brennan has been active in a number of professional organizations and regularly presents at local, state and national counseling conferences. In addition, she has written a number of scholarly articles and book chapters. Prior to her present position at John Carroll University, she taught in the Art Therapy & Counseling Program at Ursuline College and has worked as a high school teacher and counselor.