Associate Professor: K. M. Manning; Assistant Professor: J. F. Cerullo; Program Coordinator: R. P. Dolciato

Physical Education and Exercise Science provides a variety of courses to serve the recreational, fitness, and professional needs of the students. An undergraduate major in physical education, with an emphasis in exercise science or teacher education, integrated into a liberal arts course of study, provides for a well-balanced Bachelor of Arts degree. A minor in physical education complements undergraduate preparation in a variety of other majors. The physical education major or minor can be practically and professionally combined with many areas, including business, biology, sociology, psychology, and communications.

The Physical Education major prepares candidates for careers in teaching, fitness, and recreation. Candidates interested in teaching will pursue Initial Licensure course work through the Education Department.

The Exercise Science major is designed for those interested in graduate school and careers in such areas as allied health (athletic training, physical therapy), fitness, strength and conditioning, exercise physiology, sport psychology, wellness, and cardiac rehabilitation. Candidates seeking admission to graduate programs in allied health will have to take additional course work in the natural and social sciences.

Candidates interested in either major are encouraged to meet with the academic advisor to map out an inclusive four-year plan for graduation.

The Physical Education major (46 hours) combined with the appropriate teacher education courses leads to a Multi-Age teaching license in physical education.

Major and Minor Requirements


Physical Education and Exercise Science Core.
40 credit hours, required for all major or certification programs: PE 200, 202, 205, 205L, 206, 206L, 207, 208, 310, 407, 408, 409, 420, 430, 435.

Major: Physical Education (can lead to Multi-Age Licensure). 46 hours: PE core (see above), plus PE 411, 432. (For Multi-Age teaching license, additional courses in teacher education are required.)

Major: Exercise Science. 55 hours: PE core (see above), plus PE 201, 201L, 230, 304, 304L, 432, 496, or 497.

Physical Education and Exercise Science Minor. 25 hours: PE 202, 205, 205L, 206, 206L, 208, 407, 409, and two electives from the Theory and Methods courses.

Requirements for Acceptance and Continuation as a Physical Education or Exercise Science Major

The application process includes:

1. Application Process

  • A formal meeting with the academic advisor for Physical Education and Exercise Science.
  • An evaluation of academic course work.
  • A statement of professional goals and expectations related to the field of physical education or exercise science.
  • The fulfillment of the following requirements by applicants pursuing the Multi-Age Teaching License:
  • 2.7 Overall GPA
  • 2.7 Physical Education GPA
  • 2.7 Education GPA

2. Acceptance Decisions

  • Accept: Student may continue to take Physical Education and Exercise Science course work.
  • Conditional Acceptance: Student may continue to take Physical Education and Exercise Science course work, but certain restrictions have been placed on the program. Conditional acceptance may remain in effect for no longer than one (1) academic year.
  • Defer: Student is not accepted into the major at this point.

3. Continuation in the Major

  • Student evaluations will be conducted each semester for continuation in the program.

4. Capstone Experience

Internship:

  • Students will be interviewed and evaluated by the Internship Coordinator prior to enrollment in PE 497.
  • Students not approved for internship will substitute additional content-area course work.

Student Teaching:

  • Students will be approved by the Council on Teacher Education for the Student Teaching semester.

5. Exit Assessment

  • Graduates will complete a formal exit interview in their final semester of course work.
  • Graduates will complete a formal written program evaluation specific to their major.

Activity Courses

Note: Students may apply a maximum of 4 Physical Education (120-174) credits toward graduation requirements and, unless otherwise specified, no more than 8 credits from any combination of AR, CE, FA, or PE (120-174) courses. Credits from PE courses may not be used to satisfy Core or major requirements.

120. INTRODUCTORY SWIMMING 1 cr. For the nonswimmer; based on the Red Cross learn-to-swim program.

130. INTRODUCTION TO BASIC PHYSICAL CONDITIONING (MS 130) 1 cr. Introduction to the basics of physical conditioning and its benefits. Modeled on the U.S. Army method of increasingly challenging exercises to build aerobic skills and endurance leading to enhanced physical fitness. Principal aspects of stretching, conditioning, and recovery. Also, cardiovascular and respiratory fitness, weight control, and stress control.

131. ADVANCED PHYSICAL CONDITIONING (MS 131) 1 cr. Builds on the student’s knowledge of physical conditioning to increase physical fitness. Modeled on the U.S. Army method of increasingly challenging exercises to build aerobic skills and endurance leading to enhanced physical fitness. Principal aspects of stretching, conditioning, and recovery. Also, cardiovascular and respiratory fitness, weight control, and stress control.

132. LEADERSHIP IN PHYSICAL TRAINING (MS 132) 1 cr. Develops the ability to plan, organize, and lead a physical conditioning program and evaluate others conducting physical training. Uses the U.S. Army physical conditioning method.

133. ADVANCED LEADERSHIP IN PHYSICAL TRAINING (MS 133) 1 cr. Develops the ability to plan, organize, and lead a physical conditioning program and evaluate others conducting physical training. Uses the U.S. Army physical conditioning method.

142. BEGINNING GOLF 1 cr.

143. INTERMEDIATE GOLF 1 cr.

144. BODY CONDITIONING 1 cr.

146. BEGINNING TENNIS 1 cr.

147. INTERMEDIATE TENNIS 1 cr.

161. RACQUETBALL 1 cr.

163. HANDBALL 1 cr.

168. BEGINNING SELF-DEFENSE & KARATE 1 cr.

170. BASKETBALL 1 cr.

174. VOLLEYBALL 1 cr.

180. NUTRITION 1 cr.

199. SPECIAL TOPICS 1 cr.

Theory and Method Courses

200. CURRENT HEALTH ISSUES 3 cr. Current health issues affecting the daily lives of all people. Physical fitness, mental fitness, behavior, drugs, alcohol, STD, nutrition. Emphasis on current health research; discussion and application of course material.

201. CARE AND PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES I 2 cr. Prerequisites: PE 205/205L. Introduction to basic concepts of athletic training. Emphasis on common athletic injuries, basic conditioning, prevention, recognition, and treatment of athletic injuries.

201L. CARE AND PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES LAB I 1 cr. Corequisite: PE 201. Introduction to basic wrapping and taping techniques used to prevent, care for, and treat of athletic injuries. A hands-on laboratory course used to develop these basic skills.

202. ADVANCED FIRST AID AND EMERGENCY CARE 2 cr. Essential information for developing the functional first-aid capabilities required by physical education teachers, coaches, and other special-interest groups. Designed according to the guidelines of the American Red Cross for its course in Advanced First Aid and Emergency Care.

203. AMERICAN RED CROSS COMMUNITY CPR 1 cr. Techniques for basic life support for cardiopulmonary emergencies, as in cardiovascular collapse, ventricular fibrillation, or cardiac standstill. Artificial ventilation and CPR for adults, children, and infants.

205. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I 3 cr. Structure and function of the human body, including cells, tissues, and skin, as well as the skeletal, articular, and muscular systems.

205L. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I LAB 1 cr. Corequisite: PE 205. Use of slides, human skeletons, and dissections to study cells, tissues, and skin, as well as the skeletal, articular, and muscular systems.

206. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II 3 cr. Prerequisite: PE 205. Structure and function of the body, including the nervous, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, renal, and digestive systems.

206L. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II LAB 1 cr. Corequisite: PE 206. Dissection, examination of animal hearts and brains, and use of various measuring devices for studying the nervous, circulatory, respiratory, renal, and digestive systems.

207. FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND EXERCISE SCIENCE 3 cr. Major ideas, institutions, movements, and individuals in the fields of physical education and exercise science. Includes an examination of potential careers in physical education, exercise science, and allied health professions.

208. PHYSICAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 3 cr. Study of normal developmental patterns (cognitive, sensory, neurological, skeletal, muscular), and the relative influence of these systems on neuromotor maturation and motor skills development.

213. ORIENTEERING (MS 213) 1 cr. Designed to develop students’ ability to determine their location on a map, plot a course to travel/navigate over familiar and unfamiliar terrain, and end at a known/desired location. U.S. Army standard maps and equipment. A detailed introduction to the principles of land navigation and orienteering that includes map reading, compass use, terrain association, pace count, plotting techniques, route planning, and safety and survival in hot and cold weather environments.

220. SCUBA DIVING 2 cr. Scuba and skin diving. Meets or exceeds the national standards of the Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI): 1) to enable students to learn the necessary skills to enjoy skin and scuba diving activities in open water safely without the assistance of an instructor; 2) to familiarize students with the different types of equipment used in skin and scuba diving; 3) to provide students with knowledge concerning the marine environment, safety procedures, first aid, and lifesaving skills related to skin and scuba diving.

230. NUTRITION FOR ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY 3 cr. Overview of basic nutritional guidelines relevant to daily life; role of nutrition in the development and efficiency of energy systems and in physical and athletic performance; disabilities related to insufficient or inappropriate nutritional practices.

299. SPECIAL TOPICS 2-3 cr. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Topics are published in the schedule of classes for each term.

304. CARE AND PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES II 2 cr. Prerequisites: PE 201 and 201L. Topics from PE 201 expanded: in-depth examination of athletic injury evaluation, management, and basic rehabilitation concepts.

304L. CARE AND PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES II LAB 1 cr. Prerequisites: PE 201 and 201L; corequisite: PE 304. Extension of PE 201L. Emphasis on wrapping and taping techniques used to prevent, care for, and treat athletic injuries. This is a laboratory course used to develop these skills.

310. METHODS, MATERIALS, AND RESOURCES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND EXERCISE SCIENCE 3 cr. Study of functional movement as it applies to motor and sport skills in everyday activities and athletics. Examination of methodologies, materials, and resources unique to teaching these skills in physical education and allied health settings. Emphasis on developing plans and objectives as well as organizational techniques for teaching grades 4 through 12, and for working in fitness and rehabilitation environments.

397. METHODS, MATERIALS, AND RESOURCES IN OUTDOOR EDUCATION 3 cr. Methodologies unique to outdoor education. Materials and resources that permit the expansion of the curriculum beyond the confines of the classroom. Emphasis on knowledge and practical use of methods, materials, and resources.

399. SPECIAL TOPICS 2-3 cr. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Topics are published in the schedule of classes for each term.

407. EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY 3 cr. Prerequisites: PE 205 and 205L or BL 231 and BL 231L. Study of human physiology during exercise and physiological problems associated with physical stress. Emphasis on bioenergetics and neuro-muscular concepts of exercise, as well as cardiorespiratory and environmental considerations in exercise.

408. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF ATHLETICS, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND EXERCISE SCIENCE 3 cr. Administrative functions of planning and organizing programs in athletics, physical education, and exercise science. Additional emphasis on staffing, directing, and coordinating programs. Includes application in student’s area of concentration.

409. KINESIOLOGY 3 cr. Prerequisites: PE 205 and 205L or BL 231 and BL 231L. Experience in movement, analysis of the physiological bases of muscular activities, and general effects on body functions.

411. PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN EARLY CHILDHOOD 3 cr. Curriculum, procedures, methodology, instructional strategies, and physical activities that are developmentally appropriate—intellectually, physically, emotionally, and socially—for children from pre-kindergarten through the primary grades. Field experience.

420. DISABILITIES: LEARNING, MOVEMENT, AND PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT 3 cr. Disabilities encountered in schools, physical education, recreation, athletics, and allied health programs. Emphasis on the etiology of the disabilities, appropriate learning, and therapy environments to enhance physical development and motor proficiency, current qualitative and quantitative research, and techniques for assessment and program development.

430. RESEARCH AND MEASUREMENTS IN EXERCISE SCIENCE 3 cr. Statistics and research methodology used in exercise science and allied health. Emphasis on the understanding and use of essential statistical methods (descriptive and inferential) in research and in applied settings. Includes measures of central tendency, t-test, probability, hypothesis testing, ANOVA. Development of a research proposal is required.

432. MOTOR LEARNING 3 cr. Study of human motor behavior as influenced by cognitive and physiological development, maturation, motivation, and learning. Emphasis on normal development as well as regressive development as a function of aging and/or disability.

433. THEORETICAL PRINCIPLES OF STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING 3 cr. Prerequisites or corequisites: PE 407 and PE 409. Principles and concepts of body movement specific to joint biomechanics, and related issues and use of appropriate terminology, principles related to the selection and use of assessment techniques for cardiovascular efficiency and strength and conditioning. Principles which guide the development and implementation of strength and conditioning programs (pre-season, in-season and off-season). Laboratory experiences included.

435. ETHICAL PROBLEMS IN ATHLETICS, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND EXERCISE SCIENCE 3 cr. Prerequisites: PE major; junior or senior standing. The nature of ethics through the study of ethical issues in athletics, physical education, and exercise science, such as the use of performance-enhancing drugs; fitness guidelines for youth sports; recruiting, professionalism, and other current topics.

440. INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-3 cr. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Intensive study of problems and concerns in a selected area of health, physical education, or exercise science.

496. PRACTICUM 3 cr. Prerequisites: PE major; junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor and coordinator. Supervised application of the principles of exercise science in an environment selected by the individual candidates, such as athletic training, cardiac rehabilitation, fitness, coaching in environments such as education, athletics, medicine, physical therapy, and business. A proposed plan must be approved by the coordinator of PE prior to enrollment. Final paper developed in conjunction with the practicum.

497. INTERNSHIP 3 cr. Prerequisites: PE major; junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor and coordinator. Candidates select an internship assignment in line with their graduate school area of interest, e.g., athletic training, strength and conditioning, physical therapy, exercise physiology. Final paper required.

499. SPECIAL TOPICS 2-3 cr. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Topics are published in the schedule of classes for each term.