Professor: T. R. Nevin; Associate Professor: G. Compton-Engle; Visiting Instructor: K. A. Ehrhardt

The program in Latin is offered by the Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Cultures.

Major and Minor Requirements

For complete information on the major and minor in Classical Languages and Classical Studies, see page 163. For courses in Greek, see page 227.


101. BEGINNING LATIN I 3 cr.
Introduction to the language of the Romans through study of the fundamentals of Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Special attention paid to Latin roots of English vocabulary. (Fall)

102. BEGINNING LATIN II 3 cr. Prerequisite: LT 101 or equivalent. Continued study of Roman culture through further acquisition of Latin grammar and syntax. Increased emphasis on the reading of literary passages. (Spring)

201. READINGS IN MYTH AND HISTORY I 3 cr. Prerequisite: a year of college Latin or its equivalent. Review of grammar and syntax through readings taken from classical mythology and Roman history. (Fall)

202. READINGS IN MYTH AND HISTORY II 3 cr. Continuation of Latin 201 with further readings from classical mythology and Roman history, including the autobiography of St. Perpetua. (Spring)

231. LATIN PROSE AUTHORS 3 cr. Reading from a selected author, such as Cicero or Caesar. Focus on development of reading skills, along with examination of the author’s thought and cultural context.

232. INTRODUCTION TO LATIN POETRY 3 cr. Reading from a selected author, such as Catullus or Vergil. Introduction to Latin meter and poetic conventions, as well as acquisition of poetic vocabulary.

298. INTERMEDIATE SUPERVISED STUDY 1-3 cr. Supervised independent study of Latin at the intermediate level. May be repeated with a different topic.

299. SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 cr. Occasional course on a selected topic announced in advance. May be repeated with a different topic.

301. LATIN WRITING 3 cr. Practice in writing idiomatic Latin prose.

320. ROMAN EPISTOLARY WRITING 3 cr. Reading from the letters of a writer such as Cicero, Horace, Pliny, Ovid, or Seneca. May be repeated with a different author.

330. ROMAN HISTORICAL WRITING 3 cr. Roman history through the eyes of a Roman historian, such as Livy, Tacitus, Sallust, or Caesar. May be repeated with a different author.

340. ADVANCED ROMAN POETRY 3 cr. Reading from the works of a poet, such as Catullus, Vergil, Horace, Tibullus, Propertius, or Ovid. Origins of lyric, pastoral, elegiac poetry. May be repeated with a different author.

398. SUPERVISED STUDY 1-3 cr. Supervised independent study of Latin. May be repeated with a different topic.

399. SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 cr. Occasional course on a selected topic announced in advance, such as the writings of St. Augustine. May be repeated with a different topic.

410. ROMAN SATIRE 3 cr. Reading from a Roman satirist, such as Horace, Juvenal, or Persius. Study of the characteristics of Roman satire, the satirist’s view of his culture, and the influence of Roman satire on later literature. May be repeated with a different author.

450. ROMAN DRAMA 3 cr. Reading from the works of such dramatists as Plautus, Terence, and Seneca. Development of Roman drama, its connection with Roman society, and its influence on later drama. May be repeated with a different author.

490, 491. HISTORY OF ROMAN LITERATURE 3 cr. each. Lectures, discussions, and translations of authors not read previously. 490: Roman literature from the beginning to the Golden Age. 491: Nature and characteristics of Silver Age literature.

498. ADVANCED SUPERVISED STUDY 1-3 cr. Supervised study on special topics. For advanced students. May be repeated with a different subject matter.

499. SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3 cr. Occasional course on a selected topic announced in advance. May be repeated with a different topic.