Associate Professors: L. A. Koch, L. S. Curtis (Chair), G. B. Guest; Assistant Professor: B. Liu

The humanities major is a self-designed major in the liberal arts administered by the Department of Art History and Humanities. Course work is derived from the disciplines of art history, literature, history, theology and religious studies, and/or philosophy. Inquiries may be directed to the coordinator, Dr. Leslie Curtis, Department of Art History and Humanities.

Humanities Major

The humanities major focuses on the artistic, historical, religious, philosophical, and literary aspects of world cultures. This rigorous and flexible major provides a solid undergraduate education in the liberal arts that is self-designed to meet the needs and interests of the individual at any level of experience. The humanities major allows the student to explore specific periods, cultures, themes, or subjects, and to integrate the knowledge of various disciplines in a unique fashion. Areas of focus may include medieval and Renaissance studies, 19th-century studies, 20th-century studies, American studies, Asian studies, French studies, classical studies, studies in art and religion, or other themes designed by the student. Courses are selected with the approval of a major advisor in the Department of Art History and Humanities.

The major is not only excellent preparation for graduate and professional study in a variety of fields, but also a solid foundation for careers in law, medicine, international business, management, journalism, publishing, public radio and television, literature, and criticism. In addition, it has proven especially exciting for those interested in foreign-language studies, as well as for those returning to college to pursue their degree after a successful career.

Humanities Minor

The humanities minor can complement or augment any major field of study, and is especially useful for those interested in the sciences, business, and professional studies. Selection of courses should be made in consultation with the coordinator or a designated advisor in the Department of Art History and Humanities.

For information about graduate work in humanities, contact the Institute of Humanities, or check the Graduate Studies Bulletin.

Major and Minor Requirements

Major in Humanities:33 credit hours in addition to the B.A. Core divisional requirements, at least 21 of which must be at the 300 or 400 level. The 33 hours are divided into three academic areas as follows:12 credit hours in Art History12 credit hours in Literature (in original language, if possible)

9 credit hours in History, Theology and Religious Studies, and/or Philosophy

To insure interaction of the various disciplines listed above, at least 18 of the 33 hours will be focused in an area of scholarly interest such as medieval and Renaissance studies, 19th-century studies, 20th-century studies, American studies, Asian studies, French studies, classical studies, studies in art and religion, international studies, or other themes designed by the student. The remaining courses chosen to complete the major depend on the individual student’s interests. The additional hours of free electives beyond the University Core and the humanities major requirements allow the student to: 1) strengthen the area focus; 2) prepare for graduate study in one of the above fields; 3) pursue a related or different major or minor.

Language: While there is no additional language requirement beyond the Core for the humanities major, a reading knowledge of French, German, or another modern or classical language at the intermediate level is strongly recommended. This knowledge will enable the student to do research in depth and to pursue graduate study.

Minor in Humanities: 18 credit hours in addition to the Core divisional requirements, at least 12 of which must be at the 300 or 400 level. The minor requirements are divided as follows:

6 credit hours in Art History

6 credit hours in History, Theology and Religious Studies, and/or Philosophy

6 credit hours in Literature (in original language, if possible)

These courses must be related to an area focus such as medieval and Renaissance studies, 19th-century studies, 20th-century studies, American studies, French studies, Asian studies, classical studies, or others designed by the student.