Enrollment and Course Load

Orientation

All full-time freshmen are required to take part in the New Student Orientation program. There are a number of orientation sessions during the summer and a final session just before the beginning of the fall semester. Full-time transfer students are also required to take part in a one-day orientation program; usually one session is held in June, one just before the beginning of the fall semester, and one in January for all new students entering the University for the spring semester. During the orientation sessions new students are introduced to the University; meet John Carroll students, faculty, and administrators; take part in appropriate placement testing; receive academic advisement; and register for courses in the upcoming semester. Information on the New Student Orientation program is mailed to students in sufficient time to enable them to choose an appropriate session. Full-time freshmen and transfer students are not permitted to register for courses prior to the orientation sessions.

Academic Advisors

All students have, from the beginning of freshman year, an assigned faculty advisor whom they should consult regularly about curriculum planning, course registration, and other academic decisions. Freshmen and sophomores should meet at least twice a semester with their faculty advisor to discuss academic planning and scheduling. Near the end of the sophomore year, most students declare a major program and are then reassigned to a faculty advisor representing their major field of study. The Dean’s Office of the College of Arts and Sciences coordinates advisor assignments for freshmen and sophomores as well as declaration procedures.

Although students are encouraged to make full use of the help that can be provided by academic advisors, they are expected to read and understand this Bulletin and to accept ultimate responsibility for the decisions they make. In no case will a degree requirement be waived or an exception granted because students plead ignorance of regulations or assert that they were not informed of them by the advisor or other authority.

Registration

Registration is carried out as part of the orientation program for freshmen and transfer students. For students currently attending John Carroll, early registration for the following semester begins approximately six weeks prior to the close of the fall and spring semesters.

Students may not register late (i.e., once the term has started) without permission from the appropriate academic dean, department chair, and instructor, and then only for serious reasons.

Registration Changes. Changes in enrollment or registration after initial registration for classes will be permitted only through the formal procedure prescribed by the Registrar’s Office. This applies to courses added, dropped, or changed. No courses may be added after the first week of class without the permission of the appropriate academic dean, department chair, and instructor.

Withdrawal from a course or change from credit to audit status may be made up to a date specified each semester by the college or school concerned. Change of registration status will not be permitted during the last two weeks of class. Freshmen should note the special provisions under “Withdrawal Regulations” (see pages 107-108).

Student Course Loads

The normal course load for full-time students is 15 to 18 hours per week, but will vary with students’ curriculum and scholarship record. Additional tuition is charged for a course load of more than 18 hours. Permission to carry excess hours (more than 18) requires, among other considerations, at least a 3.0 average in the previous semester, and permission of the academic dean. The minimum course load for full-time students is 12 hours. Students are responsible for judging the prudent ratio between credit-hour load, co-curricular activities, and outside employment in order to allow sufficient time for academic preparation. Academic responsibilities are expected to have first priority.

Students on academic probation are required to take a reduced schedule (normally 12 semester hours in full-time programs) while their probation lasts.

Certain programs requiring more than 128 semester hours (e.g., some programs in education or science) cannot be fulfilled in the usual eight semesters of full-time attendance. In entering these programs, students who plan to graduate in four years should count on fulfilling at least some course requirements by taking summer classes.

Credit

The unit of instruction is one hour a week for one 15-week semester, or its equivalent. This unit is called a credit hour and is the measure of University work. Academic credit is given only in accordance with the course descriptions as published in this Bulletin.

Pass/Fail Option

Students who have obtained sophomore status are permitted to take up to six courses on the Pass/Fail basis with the following restrictions:

Students may not register for more than one such P/F course per semester and may not use the P/F option for any course counted toward University Core requirements or in a major sequence, optional minor, or concentration. Business majors may not use the P/F option for any of the business core courses. Students wishing to take courses on a P/F basis should discuss this action with their advisor and then obtain approval from the appropriate academic dean.

Students wishing to take the P/F option or change from the P/F option to regular grading registration should so indicate at the time of final registration or no later than the end of the second week of class. Any change in registration must be made formally at the Student Service Center, once an academic petition has been approved by the academic dean.

Students selecting the P/F option must earn a grade of C or higher to be eligible for the Pass grade. Courses completed with the Pass grade (designated “CR” for Credit) will not be included in the computation of the overall average. However, students who are registered for a course on the Pass/Fail basis but earn a grade of C- or lower will receive that grade, and it will be included in the computation of the overall average.

Students planning to enter graduate or professional schools are reminded that their admission may be jeopardized by a substantial amount of P/F course work.

Auditing

Students who audit a course do not receive credit toward graduation or a grade for the course, but the fact that they audited the course is recorded on the transcript. Such students must register for the course as “Audit” – after obtaining permission from the appropriate dean – and pay the same tuition as those who take the course for credit. Audit students are required to attend regularly. Failure to do so can result in a grade of AW.

Change of registration from credit to audit status must be carried out through the Registrar’s Office during the first two weeks of the semester. Freshmen (those with fewer than 25 hours completed) must have the approval of the academic advisor and the appropriate academic dean.

Audit for Dean’s List Students. Dean’s List students who have earned 60 semester hours of credit at John Carroll toward graduation, and who attain the distinction of being on the Dean’s List in any given semester, may during the course-change week of the following semester, with permission from the appropriate academic dean, register to audit one course without a fee. Such students are required to attend their audited courses.

The Dean’s List audit privilege may not be used for any course for which students have already registered.

Audit for Honors Program Students. All Honors Program students in good standing, who have completed at least 32 hours of course work at John Carroll University, are eligible to audit one course a semester without fee. Permission to audit a course must be obtained from the director of the Honors Program and the appropriate academic dean. Students are expected to meet the normal attendance requirements of the audited course. A student must register for the course to be audited during the first week of classes. Any earlier registration for the course to be audited invalidates the privilege of a free audit for that course.

Attendance Regulations

Students are expected to attend each and every scheduled meeting of all courses in which they are enrolled and to be present for the full class period. Absenteeism and tardiness, regardless of cause, are a threat to academic achievement. Recognizing that perfect attendance is not always possible, the University addresses the issue of absences as follows.

During the first week of a semester each instructor will provide, as part of the class syllabus, a written statement of the attendance policy for that class. The statement will contain an explanation of the consequences for absences as well as a policy on excused absences, and will be made available to each student properly enrolled in the class.

A student who is absent from a class is responsible, nevertheless, for all material covered during the class period. The student is also subject to appropriate consequences, as described by the instructor in the syllabus, if a test, quiz, recitation, homework assignment, or any other activity falls on the day of absence unless the student is granted an excused absence.

Excused Absences

A student who must miss a scheduled class meeting may be granted an excused absence at the discretion of the instructor. An excused absence entitles the student to make up any required activity that took place on the day of the absence. The student is still responsible, however, for any material covered during the class period that was missed. In case of illness, accidents, or other serious emergencies, the University presumes an excused absence would be granted.

Absences for Extracurricular Activities

Students who anticipate missing a class because of extracurricular events which are officially sponsored by the University have the responsibility to consult the syllabus for the class and identify any possible conflicts between required activities in the course and their extracurricular events. If conflicts are identified, the student should obtain an official letter of participation from the coordinator of the activity and present it, along with a schedule of events for the semester, to the faculty member involved, identifying the dates of conflict, if possible, and requesting excused absences. If possible, faculty members are to grant excused absences for these students. However, students should be aware that last-minute requests are usually inappropriate. One week prior to each event the student will present to the faculty member a written request for an excused absence and, if an excused absence is allowed, make final arrangements for any work that will be missed. If a faculty member finds it impossible to grant an excused absence, the student will be bound by the statements on attendance as described in the syllabus for the class.

If an excused absence is not granted, an appeal is first made to the course instructor. If the matter remains unsettled, the faculty member and the chair will then attempt to resolve the difficulty with the student. If this does not lead to resolution, the academic dean normally will rule in the matter.

Policy and Procedure for Making Up Missed Final Examinations

Policy. A student’s failure to take a final examination at the regularly scheduled time is a serious matter.

A student may be allowed to make up a missed final examination only under extraordinary circumstances. Reasons such as misreading the examination schedule, having three examinations on the same day, oversleeping, and the like do not normally qualify. In the process of determining whether a request for taking a make-up examination should be allowed, the burden of proof is on the student. The instructor has the right to request verification of the excuse offered by the student.

Procedure: Step 1. If a student knows beforehand that he/she will be forced to miss taking a final examination at the regularly scheduled time, it is the student’s responsibility before the scheduled time of the examination to inform the instructor and to request permission to reschedule the final examination.

If a student has missed the scheduled final examination because of extraordinary circumstances, the student is responsible for contacting the instructor by the end of the first working day after the day of the missed examination and requesting permission to take a make-up examination. If the instructor is unavailable when the student seeks him/her, the student is to contact the department office, which will contact the instructor. Leaving a note with a request to take a rescheduled final examination does not constitute permission to do so.

Step 2. The instructor, upon speaking to the student, will either deny the request or approve it and make arrangements with the student for a make-up examination to be taken, normally before final grades are due, at an agreed upon time and place.

If, after being contacted, the instructor will be unavailable to see the student, the instructor, with the department chair’s permission, may delegate authority to the chair to make the decision and leave a make-up examination with the chair in case approval is given.

Step 3. A student who is denied permission to take a make-up examination may appeal immediately to the dean of the academic unit to which the instructor belongs. In any case, any appeal must be made by the end of the first working day after the day of the denial. The decision of the dean will be final.

Withdrawal Regulations

Students are considered in attendance until they have completed all prescribed withdrawal procedures, which are as formal as registration procedures. Tuition and laboratory fees are returnable only as indicated under “Refunds” (page 30).

Students must carry out proper withdrawal procedures personally in the Student Service Center. Withdrawals during the first week of class leave no indication of the course on the student’s transcript. For withdrawals between the 2nd and 12th week of a regular semester, a W appears on the transcript; this is the time of “withdrawal without prejudice.” No withdrawals are permitted after the 12th week. Students withdrawing at any time without following proper procedures automatically receive a WF, which is considered a failing grade and is computed in the cumulative average. Final dates for the above periods are indicated in the academic calendar. Students who intend to completely withdraw from the University must notify the appropriate academic dean.

First-year students who wish to withdraw from a course, including the first week of classes, must first consult with their advisor. If the advisor is not available, students must consult with the appropriate academic dean of the College of Arts and Sciences before dropping. A first-year student must use a signed APR form to drop a course.

Academic Standing

Grading System

Students are evaluated by their retention of substantial information, insight regarding the significance of this information, ability to apply it to new situations, and ability to communicate the knowledge assimilated.

Quality Points and Averages

Candidates for a degree must attain not only a required number of credits but also a certain standard of excellence, which is determined according to quality points.

The number of quality points each grade is worth appears on the following page. The quality points earned in a course are the product of its credit hours times the quality points for the grade received in it. A grade of A earns quality points equal to 4.0 times the credit hours in the course; a grade of A-, quality points equal to 3.7 times the credit hours, and so on.

An average of at least 2.0 (C) in all courses taken for credit and at least 2.0 in the major is required for graduation. As a general rule, therefore, students must minimally accumulate quality points equal to twice the credit hours attempted at John Carroll. Quality points are computed to two decimal places. They are truncated, not rounded.

Academic standing at the end of any semester is determined by the ratio of the total number of quality points received to the total number of credit hours attempted in that semester. For example, students who earn 32 quality points while attempting 16 hours have an average of 2.00 (32÷16); students who earn 51.1 quality points while attempting 16 hours have a scholastic average of 3.19 (51.1÷16). Similarly, the cumulative average at John Carroll is determined by dividing all quality points earned by all credit hours attempted. A student who over four semesters has earned 192 quality points and attempted 67 hours has a cumulative average of 2.86 (192÷67).

The quality of work and the point system are indicated by the following grades:

A Outstanding scholarship. 4 quality points per credit hour.
A- 3.7 quality points per credit hour.
B+ 3.3 quality points per credit hour.
B Superior work. 3 quality points per credit hour.
B- 2.7 quality points per credit hour.
C+ 2.3 quality points per credit hour.
C Average. 2 quality points per credit hour.
C- 1.7 quality points per credit hour.
D+ 1.3 quality points per credit hour.
D Work of the lowest passing quality. 1 quality point per credit hour.
F Failure. If the subject is required, the course must be repeated. No credit hours, no quality points.
FA Failure because of excessive absences.
HP High Pass. Honors Program only.
P Pass. Honors Program only.
W Withdrawal through proper procedure.
WF Withdrawal without following proper procedure.
AD Audit
AW Auditor who fails to fulfill attendance requirements.
SA Satisfactory. This grade is used in noncredit courses.
I Incomplete. Work incomplete. Work is to be completed within one month following the last normal examination date of the semester in which the grade is incurred or the grade of Iconverts to F. An extension may be granted by the appropriate dean for very serious reasons, usually medical.
X Absent from final examination. Courses whose final exams are not completed within onemonth following the last scheduled examinations will convert to a grade of F.
CR Credit granted for master’s thesis upon approval, student teaching, and other designated courses. Also indicates achievement of a grade of C or better in courses taken on the Pass/Fail basis.

 

Courses in which the grades of F, FA, or WF have been assigned are counted among attempted courses in the computation of the overall average.

Student Classifications

For purposes of class standing, requirements, eligibility, and the like, degree-seeking undergraduate students are classified as follows: as FRESHMEN upon admission with proper high school credentials until the completion of 24 semester hours; as SOPHOMORES upon earning at least 25 semester hours and until the completion of 54 semester hours; as JUNIORS upon earning at least 55 semester hours and until the completion of up to 85 semester hours; as SENIORS upon earning more than 85 semester hours and until the completion of degree requirements.

Academic Honesty

Academic honesty, expected of every student, is essential to the process of education and to upholding high ethical standards. Cheating, including plagiarism, inappropriate use of technology, or any other kind of unethical behavior, may subject the student to severe academic penalties, including dismissal.

All work submitted for evaluation in a course, including tests, term papers, and computer programs, must represent only the work of the student unless indicated otherwise.

Material taken from the work of others must be acknowledged. Materials submitted to fulfill requirements in one course may not be submitted in another course without prior approval of the instructor(s).

Concerns about the propriety of obtaining outside assistance and acknowledging sources should be addressed to the instructor of the course before the work commences and as necessary as the work proceeds.

Instructors should indicate specific penalties for academic dishonesty in their course syllabi. Penalties, appropriate to the severity of the infraction, may include zero for the assignment or failure in the course. In cases of academic dishonesty where the student chooses to withdraw from a course rather than receive a course grade of “F”, the grade of “F” instead of “W” may be assigned at the faculty member’s discretion. In egregious cases and/or cases of repeat dishonesty, additional penalties may be determined by the dean, such as suspension or dismissal from the University. In a case of dismissal, Academic Dismissal will be noted on the transcript.

Any appeal by a student is to be made first to the instructor. If disputes of interpretation arise, the faculty member and chair will attempt to resolve the difficulty with the student. If this does not lead to a resolution, the appropriate academic dean normally will rule in the matter.

A written report of the incident by the instructor or department chair will be sent to the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, who will keep a written record of the complaint when it is filed, and will forward a copy of the complaint to the appropriate dean’s office at the time. The dean will place a copy of this record in the student’s file and provide the student with a copy. A written record of the complaint is kept for cases of repeat violations. The dean will review the case and determine if, in light of other information and records, further disciplinary action is warranted.

The student has the right to appeal the accusation of academic dishonesty if the student believes it to be in error. The Policy and Procedure for Appeal of a Charge of Academic Dishonesty (steps 1-5 below) will be followed if a student wishes to contest a finding of academic dishonesty.

Policy and Procedure for Appeal of a Charge of Academic Dishonesty

Policy. The instructor has both the professional competence and the jurisdiction to determine instances of academic dishonesty; the student has the right to appeal the charge when the student believes it to be in error. The only basis for an appeal is whether the charge has been determined fairly within the system described in the syllabus by the faculty member.

Every student has the right to know at the beginning of any semester how academic dishonesty will be handled. For this reason the instructor has the obligation to present this information to the student at the beginning of the semester as part of the syllabus. Once the semester begins, an instructor should not make substantial changes to the system and should inform the students of even minor changes. If an instructor does not provide such information, the student has the right to seek redress.

Procedure: Step 1. The student who wishes to contest a charge of academic dishonesty should first make an effort to discuss the matter with the instructor and attempt to resolve the problem concerning the disputed charge. (If the instructor is away from the University during the period of the appeal, the student may proceed directly to the department chair.)

Step 2. If there is no satisfactory resolution at this level and the student wishes to pursue the matter further, the student must initiate a formal appeal within a specific time period. A disputed charge must be appealed by the end of the sixth week after the student is notified of the charge. The appeal must be made in writing to the instructor and a copy sent to the department chair, who will then schedule a meeting with the student and the instructor. For appeals unresolved at the end of the semester the student will select between receiving the course grade calculated with the penalty or an I for the course.

Step 3. If the department chair cannot resolve the dispute in a manner satisfactory to the parties concerned, the chair will notify the associate dean of the school in which the course is taught. The associate dean will then attempt to resolve the problem.

Step 4.

a. If the associate dean judges that the appeal is without sufficient basis, the associate dean can so rule, and the case is closed.

b. If the associate dean is in doubt or thinks it possible that the grade should be changed contrary to the wishes of the instructor, the associate dean will request the Faculty Council to provide a list of the names of nine faculty members, randomly selected, from which the associate dean, the involved instructor, and the student each will choose three to consider the matter. (If agreement on all three cannot be reached, the associate dean will fill any remaining spots on the committee from the names on the list.)

c. Both the instructor and the student will present their cases to the committee. (The appeals committee will make no effort to establish whether an instructor’s academic honesty policy is academically sound; rather it will attempt to establish whether an instructor’s practices and procedures were followed consistently, fairly, and accurately according to the standards set forth in the syllabus and other course directives.)

d. The committee will then decide by majority vote to recommend that the grade be changed and notify the associate dean of its decision. The committee will provide the associate dean with a written summary of the main reasons for its recommendation. The associate dean will make the final decision after carefully considering the recommendation of the committee. If the final decision is contrary to the recommendation of the committee, the associate dean should explain the reasons for the decision in writing to the committee.

Step 5. The associate dean will then notify the instructor, department chair, and student of the decision, ordinarily by the end of the semester during which the appeal arose.

Policy and Procedure for Appeal of a Course Grade

Policy. The instructor has both the professional competence and the jurisdiction to determine grades; the student has the right to appeal a course grade that the student believes to be in error. The only basis for an appeal is whether the grade has been determined fairly within the grading system adopted by the faculty member.

Thus every student has the right to know at the beginning of any semester how the final grade for any particular course will be determined. This means knowing what percentage of the final grade the assignments (tests, quizzes, papers, class participation, etc.) will comprise.

For this reason the instructor has the obligation to present this information to the student at the beginning of the semester as part of the syllabus. Once the semester begins, an instructor should not make substantial changes in the grading system and should inform the students of even minor changes. If an instructor does not provide such information, the student has the right to seek redress.

Procedure: Step 1. The student who wishes to contest a course grade should first make an effort to discuss the matter with the instructor and attempt to resolve the problem concerning the disputed grade. (If the instructor is away from the University during the period of the grade appeal, the student may proceed directly to the department chair.)

Step 2. If there is no satisfactory resolution at this level and the student wishes to pursue the matter further, the student must initiate a formal grade appeal within a specific time period. (A disputed course grade from the fall semester must be appealed by the end of the sixth week of the spring semester. A disputed course grade from the spring semester or one of the summer sessions must be appealed by the end of the sixth week of the fall semester.) The appeal must be made in writing to the instructor and a copy sent to the department chair, who will then schedule a meeting with the student and the instructor.

Step 3. If the department chair cannot resolve the dispute in a manner satisfactory to the parties concerned, the chair will notify the associate dean of the school in which the course is taught. The associate dean will then attempt to resolve the problem.

Step 4.

  1. If the associate dean judges that the appeal is without sufficient basis, the associate dean can so rule, and the case is closed.
  2. If the associate dean is in doubt or thinks it is possible that the grade should be changed contrary to the wishes of the instructor, the associate dean will request the Faculty Council to provide a list of the names of nine faculty members, randomly selected, from which the associate dean, the involved instructor, and the student each will choose three to consider the matter. (If agreement on all three cannot be reached, the associate dean will fill any remaining spots on the committee from the names on the list.)
  3. Both the instructor and the student will present their cases to the committee. (The appeals committee will make no effort to establish whether a grading system is academically sound; rather it will attempt to establish whether an instructor’s grading practices and procedures were followed consistently, fairly, and accurately according to the standards set forth in the syllabus and other course directives.)
  4. The committee will then decide by majority vote to recommend that the grade be changed and notify the associate dean of its decision. The committee will provide the associate dean with a written summary of the main reasons for its recommendation. The associate dean will make the final decision after carefully considering the recommendation of the committee. If the final decision is contrary to the committee’s recommendation, the associate dean should explain the reasons for it in writing to the committee.

Step 5. The associate dean will then notify the instructor, the department chair, and the student of the decision, ordinarily by the end of the semester during which the appeal arose.

Academic Reports

Academic reports of final grades are available at the end of each semester. Reports are not to be represented as official transcripts. Authenticated transcripts will not be released until all financial obligations to the University have been fulfilled.

Mid-term grades are given to freshmen for all courses in which they are enrolled, but only grades of C- or lower are reported for other students at mid-term. None of these grades become part of the permanent record.

Students who wish their academic reports released are asked to submit written requests for release of transcripts. Forms for this purpose are available in the Registrar’s Office and in the Student Service Center. The University reserves the right to make judgments regarding the release of grades to government agencies or others making bona fide requests for information.

Course Standing

Students may repeat only once a course in which they receive a C- or lower; the higher grade received will be counted in their cumulative GPA. The other grade will remain on the transcript but will not count toward the cumulative GPA, nor will it count for credit toward graduation. Repeated courses must be taken at John Carroll. Students must submit an online academic petition to their advisor and the dean.

Graduation Requirements

Students must apply for graduation through the dean’s office of the college in which they major by the deadline announced in the University calendar.

Graduation requirements include general requirements, all Core requirements, and all requirements for the major. Successful completion of at least 128 semester credit hours, with a quality-point average of at least 2.0, is required for graduation. This minimum average must be met in the major and overall. In addition, the Boler School of Business requires a 2.0 average in the business courses. The College of Arts and Sciences requires students to meet with their major advisor to review completion of degree. An audit signed by the major advisor and department chairperson is required by the end of October for May graduation. The last 30 semester hours must be completed in residence at John Carroll University.

Summer Graduates Participating in the Spring Commencement Ceremony. The following criteria will apply for allowing students to participate in the commencement ceremonies prior to the completion of all degree requirements.

1. Undergraduate students must have no more than 9 remaining credit hours in order to complete their degree program. Two weeks prior to spring commencement, students must be registered for courses that will complete their degree requirements by the end of the summer. If the course(s) needed to graduate is (are) not offered at John Carroll University during the summer, arrangements must be completed which will insure proper transfer to the student’s degree program at John Carroll. Students planning to graduate in August should have completed an application by March 1 for the College of Arts and Sciences and by October 1 for the Boler School of Business.

2. Students cannot have more than a three-quality-point deficit in any of the various categories in which a 2.0 grade average is needed for graduation. (This includes overall grade-point average, average in the major, and, in the case of Boler School students, average in all business courses.) Quality points will be calculated after course work for the spring semester has been completed and prior to the graduation ceremony. Quality points are computed to two decimal places. They are truncated, not rounded.

3. Undergraduate students participating in the May commencement ceremony who have not completed all degree requirements will have their honors listed in the commencement program according to their overall grade-point average as of the end of spring semester.

4. Graduate students who are not writing an essay or thesis must have no more than 9 remaining hours to complete their degree program. Graduate students who have not completed the essay or thesis (but who have completed all course requirements) must submit a petition signed by their academic advisor stating that the thesis or essay will be completed by the deadline set by the Graduate Studies Office for summer school graduation. Graduate students should apply for the May commencement ceremony by March 1.

Dean’s List

Only students who are in good standing and have completed a minimum of 12 semester hours of regularly graded course work (i.e., exclusive of Pass/Fail course work) within a semester with a quality-point average of 3.50 or higher will be eligible for the Dean’s List.

Graduation Honors

The quality-point system is used to determine graduation honors. To qualify for graduation honors, a student must complete at least 60 credit hours in graded courses on the undergraduate level, all taken at John Carroll. To merit the distinction cum laude, candidates must attain a quality-point average of 3.50; magna cum laude, 3.70; summa cum laude, 3.90. These honors are inscribed on the diploma. Quality points are computed to two decimal places. They are truncated, not rounded.

Commencement

John Carroll University conducts formal commencement exercises each year in May. Attendance at these exercises is optional; those attending must wear academic cap and gown. Diplomas are also issued in January and August, but students are invited to march in commencement the following May.

Academic Warning

Students are placed on warning whenever their semester average drops below 2.0 while their cumulative average remains above this minimum, or when the cumulative average is above the levels for probation, but below 2.0. Such students receive notice of academic warning and may be excluded by their dean from certain extracurricular activities. Averages are computed to two decimal places and truncated, not rounded.

Academic Probation

Academic Probation is the status of any student whose cumulative average falls below these standards:

0-1213-24 earned hours 1.75earned hours 1.80 25-47 earned hours 1.90after 48 earned hours 2.00

Probation is imposed by the appropriate dean at the end of any semester in which the cumulative average is below these standards and continues for at least one semester until the required average is earned. Students on probation are subject to the following restrictions:

1. They may not register for a course load greater than they carried during the semester immediately preceding notice of probation. Normally registration is limited to 12-13 semester hours; in no case may a student on probation register for more than 15 semester hours.

2. Student athletes are not permitted to travel with varsity teams for competition, though they may be on the bench in street clothes for home contests. If the student chooses to continue to practice with the team, a season of participation will be charged to their eligibility.

3. They may not pledge a fraternity or sorority, or hold any elective or appointive office on campus.

Freshman Privilege

Freshman Privilege is intended to help students recover from major-direction choices that turned out not to match their real interests or talents. As a result, such students may have done poorly (D, F) in courses required by those intended programs. Yet they very often can be successful in a new and different major program.

NOTE: Petition for Freshman Privilege under these provisions must be approved by the assistant dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. The student must petition for Freshman Privilege before they earn 40 credit hours.

To improve their chances of success, these students may petition the dean—using the online Academic Petition—for the privilege of having such courses excluded from the calculation of their overall Quality Point Average (QPA). If granted, this exclusion is made on the assumption that the student will no longer pursue a major program in the same area. Thus, for example, the student would normally change from pursuing a major in science to one in liberal arts or business, or from attempting a major in business to one in science or in liberal arts. The student’s previous course work is then re-evaluated, omitting the pertinent deficiency grade or grades and credit (if the course was passed) from inclusion in the QPA. (Note, however, that repeating the course or courses for which the privilege may have been granted will nullify the privilege, and restore the deficiency grade or grades in the student’s QPA.) Courses for which the privilege has been granted remain listed on the student’s permanent record (transcript) with the designation FP.

In general, the following courses are not privilegeable: (1) those required for the completion of all undergraduate degrees, e.g., First-Year Seminar, CO 100, EN 103 or 111 or 114, EN 112 or 116, courses in one of the languages, PL and RL courses required for completion of the University Core Curriculum; (2) those not required for the completion of any undergraduate degree, e.g., AR, CE, FA, MS, PE. Other courses normally taken for Core are also not privilegeable.

Dismissal

Students are subject to dismissal for academic deficiencies by the appropriate dean if they are placed on probation for two successive semesters or if their grades decline while on probation status in any semester, or if they fail more than one course in any semester. Students who have been academically dismissed may not apply for reinstatement until at least one full semester and one summer have elapsed. (For conditions of reinstatement, see page 22.)

Transfer of Credit

Transcripts

Students who wish transcripts of records in order to transfer to another school or for other purposes should apply in person or by signed letter to the Registrar’s Office at least two weeks in advance of need. To protect students and alumni, no telephone requests for transcripts will be honored. Transcripts are issued only at the request of the student, and official transcripts are sent directly to the college or university to which transfer is desired. A fee of $3 is required for each transcript. Transcripts are released only when all outstanding balances have been paid. Further information about the services provided by the Registrar’s Office can be found on pages 54-56 of this Bulletin.

Transfer within the University

Students who wish to transfer within the University from the College of Arts and Sciences to the Boler School of Business, or vice versa, should consult with the dean’s office in both colleges.

Concurrent Enrollment and Transfer of Credit

On occasion it may be desirable or even become necessary for students to enroll as transient students at another institution. With the approval of the appropriate dean, students may assume such concurrent enrollment status at other accredited institutions. The following are situations for which deans will generally approve concurrent registration and transfer of credit:

1. Cross-registration

Full-time students with a 2.0 or better average may register for one course per semester at any of the participating colleges and universities in the Cleveland area. This is an enrichment program, and courses eligible for cross-registration are those normally not available at the home institution. Certain restrictions apply, and approval must be granted by the dean of the appropriate college, as well as the registrars at the home and host institutions.

2. Study Abroad

John Carroll University encourages students to study abroad, normally during their junior year. Students are free to choose the country and the university where they wish to study, provided they design a program of study under the direction of their academic advisor, department chair, and the coordinator for Study Abroad. The Boler School offers a program of courses in London, England, each spring semester. This program is designed specifically for sophomores who intend to major in one of the programs offered by the Boler School. A limited number of students are accepted into this program during the fall semester preceding the program. Interested students should contact the dean’s office of the Boler School or the coordinator of study abroad.

John Carroll University has special agreements with the Loyola University of Chicago Center in Rome, the Beijing Center in China, and the Berlin European Studies Program, as well as exchange agreements with Sophia University and Nanzan University in Japan. When John Carroll students take courses at any of these institutions, all grades (even Ds and Fs) and all credits received are entered upon the John Carroll transcript, and the quality-point average is modified accordingly. Financial-aid packages are applicable in these study-abroad programs to students who qualify for aid according to University financial aid guidelines.

Students may not take classes on a pass/fail option and must earn grades of C or better in all study-abroad course work.

3. Washington Internships

John Carroll University participates in semester-long internship programs with the Washington Center and American University, in Washington, D.C. Up to 16 credit hours may be completed and transferred to John Carroll. Before registering, students must make arrangements with the appropriate dean’s office.

4. Courses at other accredited institutions

John Carroll students who wish to take courses at another institution will ordinarily first consult with their advisor. Then they must obtain written permission of the appropriate dean before enrolling elsewhere. Course descriptions should be provided. For divisional Core and/or special designations, syllabi may be required. The permission, if given, will specify the terms under which credit will be transferred. The student must request that a transcript be sent to the registrar at John Carroll. A grade of C or better is required for transfer of credit. In such cases, only the credits are transferred; the grades received do not affect the student’s quality-point average at John Carroll.

No more than two special designations (D, S, R, W) may be transferred in to fulfill Core requirements.