Professor

Expertise: Molecular genetics, Genetics

Research Interests

My research focuses on genetic and molecular analysis of germline stem cells in the model organism C. elegans, a soil nematode. All multicellular organisms have stem cells which have the capacity both for becoming different types of cells (differentiation) and for retaining their identity as stem cells (self-renewal). Germline cells, the cells that give rise to gametes in animals, are stem cells. Some germline cells divide and remain as stem cells while other germline cells divide and commit to becoming gametes, i.e. eggs and sperm. My lab is currently focused on two projects: 1) identification of mutations in genes important for germline stem cell development, and 2) molecular identification and analysis of ego-3, a gene known to be important for proper germline development.

Recent Courses

BL 213 – Genetics
BL 215 – Introduction to Biotechnology Lab
BL 260 – Poverty and Disease
BL 465H – Molecular Genetics
BL 470 – Molecular Methods Lab

Selected Publications

Lissemore, J.L., Bayes, J., Calvey, M., Reineke, L., Colagiavanni, A., Tscheiner, M., and Mascotti, D.P.. 2009. Green fluorescent protein is superior to blue fluorescent protein as a quantitative reporter of promoter activity in E. coli. Mol. Biol. Rep. 36:1107-12.

Lissemore, J.L., Lackner, L.L., Fedoriw, G.D., and De Stasio, E.A. 2005. Isolation of C. elegans genomic DNA and detection of deletions in the unc-93 gene using PCR.  Biochem. Mol. Biol. Educ., 33:219-226.

Lissemore, J.L. 2005. Linkage of genetics and ethics: More crossing over is needed. Biol. Cell., 97:599-604.