Professor and Graduate Coordinator

Expertise: Systematic herpetology, Skeletal morphology, and Evolutionary development

Research Interests

I am interested in herpetology, developmental morphology, and evolution.  My research primarily focuses on aspects of skeletal development in reptiles, and recently I have been studying element homology in the hands and feet of turtles.  Graduate and undergraduate students in my lab have worked on projects that include geometric morphometric analyses of shape change in the skeletons of amphibians, descriptive morphology of embryonic turtles, ecological studies of Blanding’s Turtles and Spotted Turtle (including radiotelemetry, nesting and feeding ecology, and defining niche parameters with predictive modeling).  I am actively recruiting students to work in my laboratory.

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Recent Courses

BL 159/160 – Principles of Biology III
BL 206/206L – Tropical Biology: Study Abroad in Costa Rica
BL 350/350L – Vertebrate Anatomy
BL 405 – Scientific Illustration
BL 415 – Introduction to Systematic Biology
BL 426/426L – Biology of the Reptilia

Selected Publications

2014   Sheil CA, **Jorgensen M, **Tulenko F, and **Harrington S. Intraspecific variation in timing of ossification affects inferred heterochrony of cranial bones in Amphibia. Evolution & Development 16(5):292–305.

2014   Sheil CA, and *Zaharewicz K.  Anatomy of the fully formed chondrocranium of Podocnemis unifilis (Pleurodira: Podocnemididae). Acta Zoologica 95(3):358–366.

2014   Řeháková K, Johansen JR, *Bowen MB, Martin MP, and Sheil CA.  Variation in secondary structure of the 16 rRNA molecule in cyanobacteria with implications for phylogenetic analysis. Fottea In Press.

2013   **Harrington SM, Harrison LB, and Sheil CA.  Ossification sequence heterochrony among amphibians. Evolution and Development. 15:344–364.

2013   Sheil CA. Skeletal Development of the skull of the Hawksbill Seaturtle, Eretmochelys imbricata.  Journal of Morphology 274(10):1124–1142.

2013   *Paluh DJ, and Sheil CA. 2013. Anatomy of the fully formed chondrocranium of Emydura subglobosa (Chelidae): A pleurodiran turtle. Journal of Morphology 274:1–10.

*Undergraduate student co-author; **Graduate student co-author